Inside a Barn in the Country, by Alyssa Satin Capucilli

            The barn is in turmoil because a little mouse squeaked.  Children enjoy this book with silly illustrations and the repetitive lines.  It’s also in Rebus form so that once you have read it with the children several times, they can remember the story and re-read on their own.

Materials

  •             Animal headbands that go with the story
  •             Box of dominos
  • Pictures of animals that live/do live on the farm
  • Several large boxes from the grocery store.

Vocabulary

  •             Country (far away from the city, where farms are)

Before Reading the Story

Using the picture cards of the animals in the story; play, One of these is not like the other. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsRjQDrDnY8 Put out 3 cards where the children can see them making 1 different from the other. (2 birds & 1 not bird, cat-cow&pig, 2chicks-cards with only 1 animal, 2 w/4footed&1 w/2feet).

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare and contrast objects, events, and experiences.

Reading the Story

            Give the children the animal headbands to wear (keep them in order of the story the first few times you read this book).  Tell the children that today they are going to help you tell the story.  When you point to the child/children they are to make the animal sound that is on their headband.  Practice this several times so the children can get used to making the animal sound on command.  If you have more children then animals, make a couple sheep, hens and chicks.  In this story everyone needs a part.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

            As you read the story begin at a slow pace and then begin to read faster as you get towards the end of the book.  As you point to the children as they continue to make their animal sounds but expect mix-ups and laughter along the way.

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; shows growing capacity to maintain concentration over time on a task, question, set of directions or interactions, despite distractions and interruptions.

After Reading the Story

            Ask the children if they can remember why the mouse squeaked at the beginning of the story? Can they recall the order of the animals?

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Discovery

Have the children sort animal pictures by those that live on a farm and those that do not live on a farm.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows increasing abilities to match, sort, put in a series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as shape or size.

Music and Movement

Teach the children the song, Come and See My Farm. Teach it in Spanish if possible. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJzpFDA2rCw

Continue doing a variety of farm animals.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems. AND Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plakays, games, and performances.

Put on the song, The Barnyard Dance and have the children do the movements along with. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jcbcgg1pQjY

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plakays, games, and performances.

Blocks

            Put a box of dominos into the center today.  Show the children how to stand them up on end close together.  After they are all stood on end, gently tap the first domino and let it fall onto the next causing the row of dominoes to fall.  This is like the story, one thing affects the next!

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, stringing beads, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Art

Pick a paper plate animal and put out the materials that the children will need to make. Cotton balls for sheep, pink paint for pigs, black lima bean shapes for cow.

Creative Arts/Art; develops growing abilities to plan, work independently, and demonstrate care and persistence in a variety of art projects. AND Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop and follow through on plans.

Library and Writing

            Play I’m thinking of an animal who lives in the barn in the country.  Draw a letter onto a piece of paper and see if the child can guess the animal that starts with that letter (This is the letter P.  It sounds like /p/.  What animal starts with the letter P sound? /p/ /p/ pig!  This is the letter H.  It sounds like /h/.  What animal starts with the letter H sound?)

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing awareness of beginning and ending sounds of words.

Sand and Water

Add farm animals and sand to the table. The children can either dig for animals or you can dampen the sand and the can build a farm.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; shows increasing abilities to use compromise and discussion in working, playing, and resolving conflict with others.

Dramatic Play

            Let the children use the animal headbands in the center to act out the story or make up their own.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Math and Manipulatives

Make an extra set of the Barn animals from the story. Tape a line of masking tape onto the table. Give the children directions on where to put the animal cards. (Put the horse on the line. Put the sheep above the line. Put the cow next to the sheep. Put the mouse under the horse. etc.).

Mathematics/Geometry & SPatial Sense; builds an increasing understanding of directionality, order, and positions of objects, and words such as up, down, over, under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front, behind.

Outdoor Play

Bring the grocery boxes and red paint outside for the children to work cooperatively painting ‘barns’. When the barns are dry, the teacher can cut a door into one side. These can then be used for outside play, dramatic play center, or even the block center.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games or using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.

Transitions

Play, Who’s Being Fed? The teacher says’ (Someone on the farm today was happy to be fed. _____ _____ _____ ______ is what that someone said. So tell me (child’s name) who was fed? The child then names the animal.

Turkey-gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble Goat-naa, naa, naa, naa Etc.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare and contrast objects, events, and experiences.

Resources

The Story of Ferdinand, by Munro Leaf

            This is the story about a bull who was contented and happy being himself even if he was not like all the other bulls. This is a story about accepting others for who they are. Ferdinand is a bull who just does not like to fight and play rough like all the other bulls.  He is happy to sit and smell the flowers.

Materials

  • Dip cotton balls into different scents.  Put the cotton ball into small containers that the scent can come through. (IE; a zip lock bag with small pin holes along the seal). Seal the container so the children can not open them. (vanilla, perfume, vinegar, mouthwash, shampoo, liquid soap)
  • Tape measurer or yard stick

Vocabulary

  • Bull ( a boy cow)
  • Lonesome (sad from being alone)
  • Snort (the sound of air being forced through nose)
  •  Fierce (the fightingest)

Before Reading the Story

            Ask the children if they ever like to be alone and do quiet things all by themselves?  What kinds of things do you like to do by yourself?  Do you have a special place that you go when you want to be alone?  Show the children the front of the book and ask if they know what kind of an animal Ferdinand is (bull). Point out his neck muscles and say that bulls are very strong.  Show the children where Spain is on a globe or a map.  Explain to them that in Spain people fight with bulls kind of like how in the U.S. wrestlers fight with each other on television, it is a sport.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Reading the Story

When you get to the part where the author is telling how all the other bulls played and knocked their heads together; hold up your two fists and bump them together saying these are their heads.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

When you get to the part where Ferdinand sits on the bumble bee, stop and ask the children what they think is going to happen.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

After Reading the Story

            Ask the children how they felt about Ferdinand not wanting to fight.? What if someone wanted to fight with you, what would you do?  Is it ok to not do what everybody else is doing?  Does everyone have to like to play in the mud just because I do?  Am I being a good friend if I try to make you play in the mud when you do not want to?  Is it ok to tell somebody “no” that you do not want to do something?

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; shows increasing abilities to use compromise and discussion in working, playing, and resolving conflicts with others. AND Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Discovery

            In the story Ferdinand liked to smell the flowers.  Bring in several small containers that you have soaked a cotton ball in a scent.  Let the children sniff and guess what the scents are.  Ask them to tell you which scents they like and do not like.  Ask them to tell you what other scents they like (peanut butter, my shampoo, my baby when he’s not stinky)

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

            Begin a discussion on smells.  What do we use to smell with?  How do smells help us? (They tell us about smoke, they tell us where to find food). 

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to describe and discuss predictions, explanations, nad generalizations based on past experiences.

            Did you know that if you have a very plugged nose you can not taste food?  At lunch if someone says they do not like something, see if they will try an experiment.  Have them plug their nose and take a bite of the food.  Tell them to hold their nose until after they have swallowed. THere, you see that was not so bad.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Music and Movement

            Do the fingerplay 5 Little Bulls

 5 little bulls                                           (hold up 5 fingers)

Bumping heads                                       (bump knuckles of hands together)

Bumped too hard so went to bed.          (rub forehead)    

4 Little bulls                                          (hold up 4 fingers)

Bumping Heads                                      (bump knuckles of hands together)

Bumped too hard so went to bed. (rub forehead)

3 bulls

2 bulls

1 little bull                                             (hold up 1 finger)

Couldn’t bump heads                               (shrug shoulder

He got bored so off he fled                         (put hands behind back)

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

            Teach the children the fingerplay, Here Is The Beehive

                        Here is the beehive                                   (Make a fist with hand)

                        But where are the bees?                            (Shrug shoulders)

                        Hiding away where nobody sees.            (Use other hand to point to fisted hand)

                        Oh, do you hear them?                             (Hold fisted hand to ea

                        They’re coming out of the hive

                        Here come the bees, 1,2,3,4,5!                   (Open up hand as count out the bees)

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count in sequence to 10 and beyond.

Blocks

            Encourage the children to use the blocks to make a fence.  Can they make a pattern fence with the blocks?

Mathematics/Patterns a & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials.

Art

            Cut out circles, petal shapes, leaf shapes, and long strips for stems. Let the children collage the parts together to make flowers.

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities to create drawings, paintings, models, and other art creations that are more detailed, creative, or realistic.

Library and Writing

Ask each child what it is that they especially like to do. Write their responses onto a piece of paper. Encourage the child to then illustrate their words. (I like to pet my cat cause he is soft and tickles me. I like to play video games on my Mommies phone. I like to play with my sister).

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities using writing, drawing, and art tools, including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes, and various types of technology.

Sand and Water

            Add silk or real flower petals to the water today.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Dramatic Play

            Put fresh or silk flowers onto the table for the children to enjoy.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Math and Manipulatives

Using unifix cubes or counters, put out two sets and ask the children to count each set and tell you which has more or which has less.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use language to compare numbers of objects with terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, and equal to.

Outdoor Play

            Encourage the children to run and jump on the playground.  Set up a long jump area.  Mark a line across the ground and bring out a tape measurer.  Have the children run and at the line jump as far as they can.  Measure the children’s jumps using a tape measurer or yard stick.  Also have the children stand at the line and jump from this standing position.  Measure the length of their jumps.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows progress in using standard and non-standard measures for length and area of objects.

Transitions

            Ask the children questions about their five senses as they go off to the next activity.  What do you use your nose for?  How does your nose help you to know about the world?  What is one thing you have to do to take care of your nose?  Continue using all the senses.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment.

Resources

flower collaging

Too Many Pears! by Jackie French

            This is a book to teach children about fruit, especially pears.  Pamela the cow just can’t seem to get enough pears.  This is a fun book to help the children try to problem solve how to stop Pamela from eating all the pears!

Materials

  •  Several pears and a plastic knife to cut.
  •  Pretty bowl
  • Bag of pom poms, several tongs/tweezers, and bowls
  • Several Place setting pictures with parts cut out separately
  • Model for outside jumping game, see resources

Vocabulary

  •  Orchard (a place where fruit and or nut trees grow.)

Before Reading the Story

            Begin a discussion about favorite foods.  Ask the children what happens if they eat too much food (I throw up, my belly gets hurting, I burp really, really loud).  Show and read the children the cover of the book.  Ask them how they think Pamela is feeling, why?

Language Development/Speaking & Understanding; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions, ; and for other varied purposes. AND Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Slowly read the cover of the book sounding out the words.  Watch to see if any children are able to recognize beginning letters and their sounds.

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing awareness of beginning and ending sounds in words.

Reading the Story

            Stop when you get to the page where Pamela is tied to a tree.  Ask the children to help think of ways to keep Pamela from eating all the pears.  Write their ideas down on chart paper.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

After Reading the Story

            Bring in a pear so that the children can try a small piece.  Make a graph that shows I like pears/I do not like pears.  The children can write their name on the corresponding side after they taste the pear.  After all the children have put their name on the pear graph, ask them if more or less children liked the pears.  How many children in total said they liked pears?

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; begins to make comparisons between several objects based on one or two attributes. AND Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying and writing familiar words such as their own name.

Discovery

            While you are preparing a pear for the children to taste test, pass one around so that the children may smell it and feel it.  Open it up and show the children the seeds inside.  Are there a lot of seeds or just a few?  What color are they?  Bring in two different kinds of pears, are they the same inside?

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships

Music and Movement

            Do the Pear poem with the children.  As you say the poem make up simple actions for the children to do.

Way up high in the pear tree,

Two yellow pears smiled down on me.

So I shook that tree as hard as I could

And down fell the pears and were they good!

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

            Sing Where Oh Where Are All the Children, to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsZ6RS67oAY

Where oh where are all the children,

Where oh where are all the children?

Where oh where are all the children,

Way down yonder in the pear orchard.


Picking pears, put them in the basket,

Picking pears, put them in the basket.

Picking pears, put them in the basket

Way do yonder in the pear orchard.

(Do other fruits and vegies. My class liked cutting broccoli, pulling carrots, digging potatoes, picking up watermelon, etc.).

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plays, games, and performances. AND Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences.

Blocks

            Attach 5-10 yellow pear shapes, orange orange shapes, and red apple shapes to blocks and ask the children to sort by kinds or make a pattern. 

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials.

Art

            Cut out large fruit shapes and put them at the easel for the children to paint.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing, and art tools, including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes, and various types of technology.

Library and Writing

            Give each child a cow shape.  Ask them to glue it too the paper and draw a picture about their idea to stop Pamela.  Dictate.  Use the chart paper from rug time to review and get the children started.

Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and in play.

Sand and Water

Pour the pom poms into the table and set out the tongs and several bowls or ice cube trays. The children use the tongs to pickup the pom poms and sort them by color.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows increasing abilities to match, sort, put in a series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Dramatic Play

            Put all the plastic fruits into a large bowl today and put it out on the kitchen table.  As the children play in dramatics today, ask them if they can name all the fruits in the bowl.  Do they know where the fruits grow, a tree, a vine, or a plant?

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Math and Manipulatives

Make several place setting pictures and cut each piece out individually (fork, spoon, knife, and plate). Tell the child that they are pretending a friend is coming to eat with them. How many place setting do you need to make? Remind them that they need to set one for themselves also. How many place settings do you need if two friends were coming over? Have the child fix the place settings making sure each gets all the parts.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondences in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Outdoor Play

Draw the jumping board on the cement using chalk. Instead of filling in with shapes, fill it in with simple pictures of fruits and vegies. Have a child stand at one end and name a fruit/vegie on the jumping board. The child jumps onto the correct square. Try naming 2-3 at a time and see if the child can jump from square to square in the correct order.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Transitions

Hold up a piece of plastic food from the dramatic center and ask a child to name it. Ask them if they can make the first sound in the word. Ask them if they can clap out the syllables of the word.

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing awareness of the beginning and ending sounds in words. AND Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing ability to hear and discriminate separate syllables in words.

Resources

cut out each utensil separately. Make 3-5 sets
Draw simple fruits and vegies into each square for jumping