Just Going to the Dentist, by Mercer Mayer

            It’s time for Little Critter’s dental check-up.  Follow him as he goes through a typical dentist visit.  Children enjoy little Critter as he has a way of taking some of the fear out of an unknown experience, like going to the dentist.

Materials

  •  Giant mouth picture
  •  Several sanitized styrofoam egg cartons
  • Several old but sanitized toothbrushes
  • Several pieces of sandpaper in different grits
  • Dentist supplies (see dramatic play)
  • Several bottles of glue and many one inch squares of white paper

Vocabulary

  •  Cavity (A hole in your tooth)
  • Braces (Bands that go around your teeth to make them straighter)
  • Herbivore (animal or person who does not eat any meat)
  • Omnivore (an animal or person who eats both animal meat and plants)
  • Carnivore (an animal or person who only eats animal meat)
  • Rough (not smooth. bumpy)

Before Reading the Story

            Tell the children that your story today is about a special kind of career helper.  This person takes care of our teeth when they get sick with cavities.  Does anyone know who this career helper is?  Once the children have identified the helper as the dentist, let them talk of any dentist experiences they might have had.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, nedds, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Reading the Story

            As you read, point out different tools in the dentist office.  Have the children repeat back the names and then continue readind.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

After Reading the Story

            When you get to the page where the dentist gives Little Critter a lollipop, ask the children if that is really a healthy food for their teeth?  Ask them what they think would be a healthier treat for their teeth. Talk to them about how sticky foods and sugars attach to your teeth and cause cavities. Ask the children if they know the most important thing they can do to keep their teeth healthy? (Brush after meals)

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities. AND Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment.

Discovery

            Ask your dentist for some old x-rays of your teeth.  These can be taped to the window or held up to the light.  Also bring in any teeth that you might have to share.  (Your own, shark, animal, tooth castings). An old cassette holder works well for holding small items (teeth) that you do not want the children to hold loose.  Put the teeth inside and tape it shut.  Show the picture of the different kinds of teeth (herbivore, omnivore, and carnivore). The children can then use a magnifying glass to compare the different kinds of teeth.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods/begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Music and Movement

            Teach the Tooth Brushing cadence.

Brush your teeth every day,

Up and down it is the right way.

Back and forth and circles too,

This is what we have to do.

Brush your teeth every day,

Up and down it is the right way.

(Children can act out the motions of brushing)

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; shows growing independence in hygiene, nutrition, and personal care when eating, dressing, washing hands, brushing teeth, and toileting.

Make a large copy of the poem, My Mouth and hang it on the wall. Teach the children the poem while pointing out the various types of teeth.

My Mouth

My incisors are for biting

My canines are for tearing

My molars are for munching,

And my smile is for sharing.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses and increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Blocks

            Tell the children that today they can pretend to be the denist and remove the plaque and sugars from the teeth. On some of the blocks, make a mark using a marker. These are the cavities that the dentist will have to remove. Give the children several different grits of sandpaper and allow them to sand of the marks.   Can they feel the different grits of sandpaper?  Introduce the words rough and smooth to the children.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships. AND Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Art

            Make several copies of the giant mouth pattern and cover with contact paper.  Put into the play dough center and let the children use the play dough to make teeth.  Count the teeth after they have finished. 

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Sand and water

            Put Styrofoam egg cartons that have been sanitized into the water table with some toothbrushes.  The children can pretend to brush the egg carton teeth.  Add a small bit of paint to act as food on the tooth and let the children scrub it off. 

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Library and Writing

            Give each child a giant mouth picture.  Ask them to write the letters of their names across the teeth and cut out the mouths. 

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors. AND Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name.

Dramatic Play

            Add several hand mirrors to the center and Popsicle sticks along with “office” kinds of materials. If available, add some rubber gloves, safety glasses and a smock. The children can play Dentist using a new Popsicle stick for each mouth that they look into. 

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex. AND Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops a growing awareness of jobs and what is require to perform them.

Math and Manipulatives

            Before beginning; have the children chant “Not a lot, just a drop.  Not a lot, just a drop”.  This chant works well for teaching children about glue and toothpaste amounts.  Give each child a bottle of glue and ten 1” squares of paper.  Draw a line onto another piece of paper.  Challenge the children to glue 5 squares above the line and 5 squares below the line.  As they glue have them chant’ “Not a lot, just a drop”.  Have them count the teeth/squares above the line, under the line, and all together.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increased abilities to combine, separate, and name “how many” concrete objects. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Outdoor Play

            Have the children use old tooth brushes and a bucket of water to practice tooth brushing motions on the sidewalk. The water dries quickly, which encourages the them to continue with the motions. For a dirty tooth effect, use chalk to draw the teeth, add cavities. This will take longer to clean off the sidewalk, hence more practice. If available, let the children use 2 minute timers while they play. 

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Transitions

            Ask the children to name foods that they crunch with their teeth.  Name a food that sticks to your teeth when you eat it.  Name a food that is healthy for your teeth.  Name a food that is unhealthy for your teeth. 

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Resources

Dear Parents,

            Today we read a story about going to the dentist.  Ask your child to talk about and share any memory they have of a dentist visit.  Remind them at bedtime how important it is to clean their teeth by brushing them well.  Brush your teeth together and model good brushing technique.

Check out the web site http://www.colgatebsbf.com They have information and a free booklet that you can send home to parents for adult education.

The Rainbow FIsh, by Marcus Pfister

Rainbow fish thinks he is so beautiful and special that he does not want to share with others. What he learns is that to have friends, one must be a friend and share.

Materials

  • Shiney and silver materials that can be used for collaging (foil, ribbon, sequence, papers)
  • A silver writing marker or pen
  • Sidewalk chalk and spray bottle
  • Minnows (found in a bait shop) This is an added expense but if you can afford is really fun to do.

Vocabulary

  • Shiney (something that sparkles)
  • Silver (a color)
  • Scales (the skin covering of fish)
  • Fin (the part that moves to help fish swim)
  • Gills (the part of the fishes body that help it get air to breath)

Before Reading the Story

Ask the children how they feel when someone ignores them or is not nice to them? Ask the children what does it mean to share? How do you feel when someone shares with you or you share with someone else? Allow the children to discuss any ideas they have about friendship and sharing.

Language Development/Speaking & Understanding; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes. AND Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; progresses in responding sympathetically to peers who are in need, upset, hurt, or angry; and in expressing empathy and caring in others.

Reading the Story

On the page where the octopus tells Rainbow Fish to share his scales, ask the children if they know why this will make Rainbow Fish happy? (Because he is sharing)

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation;demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

After Reading the Story

Ask the children if they know what makes a good friend? Allow them to discuss and write their responses onto a piece of paper (or small fish shapes) and hang it on the wall. (My brother is my friend because he plays with me, Amy is my friend cause she let me ride the bike). As the children discuss, reinforce the concepts of sharing and kind acts.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Discovery

Bring in pictures of real fish for the children to examine and compare. Ask them to describe each fish with 2-3 attributes. (It is fat, it has stripes, it has a big mouth, it has teeth, it is long). As the children compare pictures, introduce words such as fin, scale, and gills. Have them repeat the words back and try to use in sentence.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Music and Movement

Sing 5 Little Fish Swimming in the Water. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtgdKHt1W9E

Teach the children the first verse of Fish Song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRRe6bHNDkA

Fish have fins and are covered with scales.

They swim in the water and breath with their gills.

(After the children can repeat the verse, pretend to be fish and swim around the classroom. Can you swim fast, slow, in circles, very low, backwards?)

Language Development/Listening & Understanding;demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Blocks

Tell the children that many fisher people fish from a boat. Challenge the children to build a boat they can get inside of.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Art

Put out shiney and silver materials that the children can collage with today. These will show up nicely on black construction paper.

Creative Arts/Art; begins to understand and share opinions about artistic products and experiences.

Library and Writing

Cut out scale shapes, one per child. Encourage the child to write or mark their letters on the scale using a marker. Then ask the child what they are willing to share with others? Write their response under their name. Hang all the scales together on the wall with a fish head shape and a tail.

Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name. AND Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; progresses in responding sympathetically to peers who are in need, upset, hurt, or angry; and in expressing empathy and caring in others.

Sand and Water

Fill the table with COLD water today. Add the live minnows. Make sure the children wash their hands both before and after touching the fish and stress the importance of being gentle when touching. (When I have done this with children, some are very interested and some are a bit afraid. Though this will require some adult supervision, it is a fun and different sensory activity for children).

Science/Scientific SKills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships. AND Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities.

Dramatic Play

Math and Manipulatives

Cut out a simple fish shape in small, medium, large, and largest. Cut these out in several colors. The children can use them to sort by size or shape or put them in order from small to large. If you cut out a large variety they can use to make patterns.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows increasing abilities to match, sort, put in series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as size or shape.

Outdoor Play

Give the children sidewalk chalk to write on the cement today. ENcourage them to practice writing their name or draw fish. When they are finished they can use a spray bottle of water to spray over their writing/fish.

Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from scribbles, shapes or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities to use writing , drawing, and art tools, including pencils, markers, chalk paint brushes, and various types of technology.

Transitions

Send the children to the next activity by having them pretend to swim like a fish. Call out colors starting with silver, then gold. (If you are wearing silver go line up. Remind children to check around zippers and shoelace holes).

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Resources

The Story of Ferdinand, by Munro Leaf

            This is the story about a bull who was contented and happy being himself even if he was not like all the other bulls. This is a story about accepting others for who they are. Ferdinand is a bull who just does not like to fight and play rough like all the other bulls.  He is happy to sit and smell the flowers.

Materials

  • Dip cotton balls into different scents.  Put the cotton ball into small containers that the scent can come through. (IE; a zip lock bag with small pin holes along the seal). Seal the container so the children can not open them. (vanilla, perfume, vinegar, mouthwash, shampoo, liquid soap)
  • Tape measurer or yard stick

Vocabulary

  • Bull ( a boy cow)
  • Lonesome (sad from being alone)
  • Snort (the sound of air being forced through nose)
  •  Fierce (the fightingest)

Before Reading the Story

            Ask the children if they ever like to be alone and do quiet things all by themselves?  What kinds of things do you like to do by yourself?  Do you have a special place that you go when you want to be alone?  Show the children the front of the book and ask if they know what kind of an animal Ferdinand is (bull). Point out his neck muscles and say that bulls are very strong.  Show the children where Spain is on a globe or a map.  Explain to them that in Spain people fight with bulls kind of like how in the U.S. wrestlers fight with each other on television, it is a sport.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Reading the Story

When you get to the part where the author is telling how all the other bulls played and knocked their heads together; hold up your two fists and bump them together saying these are their heads.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

When you get to the part where Ferdinand sits on the bumble bee, stop and ask the children what they think is going to happen.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

After Reading the Story

            Ask the children how they felt about Ferdinand not wanting to fight.? What if someone wanted to fight with you, what would you do?  Is it ok to not do what everybody else is doing?  Does everyone have to like to play in the mud just because I do?  Am I being a good friend if I try to make you play in the mud when you do not want to?  Is it ok to tell somebody “no” that you do not want to do something?

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; shows increasing abilities to use compromise and discussion in working, playing, and resolving conflicts with others. AND Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Discovery

            In the story Ferdinand liked to smell the flowers.  Bring in several small containers that you have soaked a cotton ball in a scent.  Let the children sniff and guess what the scents are.  Ask them to tell you which scents they like and do not like.  Ask them to tell you what other scents they like (peanut butter, my shampoo, my baby when he’s not stinky)

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

            Begin a discussion on smells.  What do we use to smell with?  How do smells help us? (They tell us about smoke, they tell us where to find food). 

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to describe and discuss predictions, explanations, nad generalizations based on past experiences.

            Did you know that if you have a very plugged nose you can not taste food?  At lunch if someone says they do not like something, see if they will try an experiment.  Have them plug their nose and take a bite of the food.  Tell them to hold their nose until after they have swallowed. THere, you see that was not so bad.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Music and Movement

            Do the fingerplay 5 Little Bulls

 5 little bulls                                           (hold up 5 fingers)

Bumping heads                                       (bump knuckles of hands together)

Bumped too hard so went to bed.          (rub forehead)    

4 Little bulls                                          (hold up 4 fingers)

Bumping Heads                                      (bump knuckles of hands together)

Bumped too hard so went to bed. (rub forehead)

3 bulls

2 bulls

1 little bull                                             (hold up 1 finger)

Couldn’t bump heads                               (shrug shoulder

He got bored so off he fled                         (put hands behind back)

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

            Teach the children the fingerplay, Here Is The Beehive

                        Here is the beehive                                   (Make a fist with hand)

                        But where are the bees?                            (Shrug shoulders)

                        Hiding away where nobody sees.            (Use other hand to point to fisted hand)

                        Oh, do you hear them?                             (Hold fisted hand to ea

                        They’re coming out of the hive

                        Here come the bees, 1,2,3,4,5!                   (Open up hand as count out the bees)

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count in sequence to 10 and beyond.

Blocks

            Encourage the children to use the blocks to make a fence.  Can they make a pattern fence with the blocks?

Mathematics/Patterns a & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials.

Art

            Cut out circles, petal shapes, leaf shapes, and long strips for stems. Let the children collage the parts together to make flowers.

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities to create drawings, paintings, models, and other art creations that are more detailed, creative, or realistic.

Library and Writing

Ask each child what it is that they especially like to do. Write their responses onto a piece of paper. Encourage the child to then illustrate their words. (I like to pet my cat cause he is soft and tickles me. I like to play video games on my Mommies phone. I like to play with my sister).

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities using writing, drawing, and art tools, including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes, and various types of technology.

Sand and Water

            Add silk or real flower petals to the water today.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Dramatic Play

            Put fresh or silk flowers onto the table for the children to enjoy.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Math and Manipulatives

Using unifix cubes or counters, put out two sets and ask the children to count each set and tell you which has more or which has less.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use language to compare numbers of objects with terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, and equal to.

Outdoor Play

            Encourage the children to run and jump on the playground.  Set up a long jump area.  Mark a line across the ground and bring out a tape measurer.  Have the children run and at the line jump as far as they can.  Measure the children’s jumps using a tape measurer or yard stick.  Also have the children stand at the line and jump from this standing position.  Measure the length of their jumps.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows progress in using standard and non-standard measures for length and area of objects.

Transitions

            Ask the children questions about their five senses as they go off to the next activity.  What do you use your nose for?  How does your nose help you to know about the world?  What is one thing you have to do to take care of your nose?  Continue using all the senses.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment.

Resources

flower collaging