The Golden Egg Book, by Margaret Wise Brown

            A little bunny finds an egg, what could be inside?  How will he find out?  This is a classic first mystery story for children.

Materials

  • Pictures of 5 animals that come from eggs
  • One hard boiled egg
  • Lots of plastic Easter eggs
  • Enough plastic eggs for everyone in the class to hold one.  Fill them with rice, penny, paperclip, etc.  You will need two of each egg.  Tape them closed so the children can not open them.
  • Duck-Rabbit flannel
  • Pre-made egg shapes 1-10 and many paperclips.
  • Several plastic cups, a piece of string and small sponge for each, a bowl of water.

Vocabulary

  •  Mystery (something secret)

Before Reading the Story

            Put a hard boiled egg inside of a small bag.  Tell the children that you brought something in your bag but it is a mystery.  Shake the bag; can anyone guess what it is?  Give the children clues and see if they can guess (it comes in many colors and sometimes is even speckled, we can eat it, it’s shaped like an oval, it comes from a reptile or a bird).  Have a child put their hand in the bag and feel the egg.  If they still do not guess, have a child pull it out of the bag.  Tell the children that birds like chickens and cardinals/bird in your area come out of eggs.  Show the children several pictures of other animals that come from eggs like alligators, turtles, snakes, birds, and spiders, frogs.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences.

Reading the Story

            After reading the page about what the bunny thought might be in the egg, ask the children what they think is inside?  After reading the part where the bunny threw a little rock, ask the children if throwing a rock at it was a good idea?  What could the bunny have done besides throwing a rock? 

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; predicts what will happen next in a story. AND Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

After Reading the Story

              Cut out the animals that come from eggs and cut a piece of construction paper into an oval.  Lay the animals where the children can see them.  Tell the children to close their eyes and count to five.  While they are counting, cover one of the animals with the egg shape.  Can they guess which one is hidden?  Go around your circle letting each child have a turn and play until the children get tired or can easily name the missing animal.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in playing games or using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.

Discovery

            Put the plastic eggs into a basket and tell the children that there are pairs that when shaken will make the same sound.  Ask the children to try to find the pairs of eggs by listening carefully while they shake them.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships.

Music and Movement

            Sing some of your favorite songs while everyone shakes an egg. Use your eggs from science or fill enough with rice so that every child has an egg to shake.

Creative Arts/Music; experiments with a variety of musical instruments.

Sing Shake Your Egg to the tune of Jingle Bells

Shake your egg, shake your egg,

Shake it very high

Shake it low, shake it fast,

Shake it very slow

Shake your egg, shake your egg

Shake behind your back

Now shake your egg, shake your egg

And put it in your lap.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress infollowing simple and multiple-step directions.

Make the duck/rabbit from resources and use it to teach the children the poem; My Little Yellow Duck

My little yellow duck,

Is really very funny

When you turn him over,

He becomes a little bunny!

(The first time you read the poem…When you turn the duck over to become a bunny, go slowly and see if the children can guess what the duck will become).

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; grows in recognizing and solving problems through active exploration, including trial and error, and interactions and discussions with peers and adults.

Blocks

            Put several eggs into the center.  Ask the children to build ramps for them to roll down.  Will the egg roll faster or slower if the ramp is higher/lower?  How can you make it so the eggs won’t fall off the ramp?

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; grows in recognizing and solving problems through active exploration, including trial and error, and interactions and discussions with peers and adults.

Art

            Cut out egg shapes from manila files.  Put out tissue paper squares and a bowl of glue mixed with a little water to thin it out.  Give the children paint brushes to paint the glue onto the egg.  Stick the tissue paper squares on top and add another layer of glue.  The colors will blend to make new colors.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing, and art tools, including, pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes, and various types of technology.

Sand and Water

            Put egg halves in the sand or water.  The children can use them to scoop/pour and to fill and put together.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Library and Writing

            Ask the children to draw an animal that might be inside an egg.  After they have drawn, place a construction paper egg over their picture.  You can cut out a hole in the egg so it makes a peek through picture.  On the bottom of the egg write; What’s inside Kerry’s egg?  The children can write their own names and these can be stapled together to make a book. 

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities to create drawings, paintings, models, and other art creations that are more detailed, creative, or realistic. AND Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying and writing familiar words such as their own name.

Dramatic Play

            Let’s cook eggs, either pretend or real.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Math and Manipulatives

            Cut out 1-10 eggs from manila files.  Label them 1-10.  Put the appropriate number of dots along the edge.  Show the children how to put the appropriate number of paperclips onto each egg.  Ask them to place them on the table in the proper 1-10 order.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer. AND Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Outdoor Play

            Chicken noise makers.  https://allfortheboys.com/chicken-in-a-cup/ Take a plastic cup and poke two small holes into it.  String the yarn through the holes and tie a knot.  Wet the sponge and run it down the length of the yarn while another child holds the cup.  As you jerk the sponge down the yarn, it makes it squeaky, clucking sound.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Transitions

Play I’m Thinking. Let the children take turns guessing what you are thinking of. Always start out with a shape. If they cannot come up with something that shape, add more details. (I’m thinking of something that is shaped like an oval, I’m thinking of something that is square that we use to watch videos on).

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; grows in recognizing and solving problems through active exploration, including trial and error, and interactions and discussions with peers and adults.

Do with egg shapes

Ten Little Mice, by Joyce Dunbar

                  This lovely illustrated book helps children count down by one while learning about the life habits of field mice.  A charming book that children will enjoy.

Materials;

                  Ten mice***

                  Mouse bookmark directions

                  Mouse mask***

                  Soft pillows and fabrics

                  Several ping-pong balls

                  Bag of cotton balls

                  Several bowls

                  Tongs or clothespins

Shapes printed on colored paper. See resources.

Vocabulary;

                  Cozy (something warm and comfortable)

Before Reading the Story

                  Use one of the mice pieces and on several colors of construction paper draw a simple house.  Have the children take turns hiding their eyes and put the mouse under one of the houses.  Have the children repeat the following, Little Tommy Tiddlemouse, lives in a pretty house.  Can you guess which one?  The child then uncovers their eyes and guesses under which color the mouse is hiding.  Encourage the child to name the colors instead of just pointing. Play till all the children get a turn or until they lose interest.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games and using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.

Reading the Story

                  Put the ten mice on the wall or flannel.  As you read the story take one down accordingly.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness if numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quantity.

After Reading the Story

                  Go back through the story and talk about the pictures.  Note the things that the mice are bigger then and smaller then.  Ask the children if they can think of other things that a mouse would be bigger then or smaller then.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows progress in using standard and non-standard measures for length and area of objects.

Discovery;

                  Bring in a book or pictures of real mice so the children can explore the life and times of a mouse.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Music and Movement

                  Re-read the story and ask the children to show what all the different movements would look like that the mice did as they went back to their cozy nest.  Who can show me what scurry-scurried looks like?

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Teach the children the song Five Little Mice sung to 5 Little Ducks. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9rqAO2zSIc

Five little mice came out to play
Gathering crumbs along the way
Out came pussycat sleek and fat
Four little mice go scampering back

Four little mice came out to play
Gathering crumbs along the way
Out came pussycat sleek and fat
Three little mice go scampering back

Three little mice came out to play
Gathering crumbs along the way
Out came pussycat sleek and fat
Two little mice go scampering back

Two little mice came out to play
Gathering crumbs along the way
Out came pussycat sleek and fat
One little mouse goes scampering back

One little mouse came out to play
Gathering crumbs along the way
Out came pussycat sleek and fat
No little mice go scampering back.

Mathematics/Number & operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Do the following poem with the children. The teacher is the old grey cat. After doing the poem once, the children can take turns being the old grey cat.

The old gray cat is sleeping , sleeping, sleeping,
The old gray cat is sleeping in the house
The little mice are dancing, dancing, dancing (children dance)
The little mice are dancing in the house (continue dancing)
The little mice are nibbling, nibbling, nibbling (children nibble)
The little mice are nibbling in the house!
The little mice are resting, resting, resting (children sit or lay)
The little mice are resting in the house (continue sitting)
The old gray cat comes creeping, creeping, creeping (Cat begins to creep)
The old gray cat comes creeping in the house (Continue Creeping)
The little mice go scampering, scampering, scampering (Children run around)
The little mice go scampering in the house (Children run until caught then that child is the cat)

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Blocks

                  Challenge the children how to use the blocks to make hallways or paths.  Pretend the ping-pong balls are mice and roll them through the hallway maze. Can they roll from beginning to end? Can the children make the mouse/ping pong ball roll under or over an object or around a corner?

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; grows in recognizing and solving problems through active exploration, including trial and error, and interactions and discussions with peers and adults.

Art

Put out the many colored shapes and scissors for the children to make mice. You can make one ahead of time so they can see how the shapes go together. For older children, draw and cut out the shapes using a manilla folder. The children can then draw around your shapes onto pieces of paper that they can then cut out.

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; progresses in ability to put together and take shapes apart. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Library and Writing;

                  Have the children make bookmarks by following the direction cards.  Cut out the oval shapes in various colors.  Show the children how to use a single hole punch to make an eye and a hole for a tail.  Give each child a piece of yarn to put through the tail hole, tie. 

Literacy/Early Writing; develops understanding that writing is a way of communicating for a variety of purposes.

Sand and Water

Hide the following letters in the sand table; M-O-U-S-E. On a piece of paper write ‘MOUSE’ above the table. Encourage the children to find the letters and put them in the same order as the word on the wall to spell mouse. Use magnet letters, cookie cutter letters, or make letters out of cardboard to hide. Can the children identify any of these letters?

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; shows progress in associating the names of letters with their shapes and sounds.

Dramatic Play

                  In the story the mice all went home to their cozy nest.  Bring in soft and cozy fabrics and pillows so the children can pretend to be mice in a cozy nest.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Math and Manipulatives

                  Put out a bowl of cotton balls and a pair of tongs or a clothespin.  Show the children how to pick up the cotton balls with the tongs and move it to another bowl.  Roll a dice and count how many cotton balls you will need to move.

Mathematics/Number & operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Physical Health Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Outdoors Play

                  Challenge the children to build tunnels under the sand.  You may have to dampen the sand ahead of time so it has some sticking power as these are very sensitive to collapsing.

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop and follow through on plans.

Transitions

                  Put 0-10 mice up on the board.  Ask the child to count and name the number of mice present before they move to the next activity.

Mathematics/Number & operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Resources

Enlarge and attach to a sentence strip to make mouse hats for dramatic play
Make 4 sets to use mice for counting throughout the day
Instructions for bookmarks

Just Going to the Dentist, by Mercer Mayer

            It’s time for Little Critter’s dental check-up.  Follow him as he goes through a typical dentist visit.  Children enjoy little Critter as he has a way of taking some of the fear out of an unknown experience, like going to the dentist.

Materials

  •  Giant mouth picture
  •  Several sanitized styrofoam egg cartons
  • Several old but sanitized toothbrushes
  • Several pieces of sandpaper in different grits
  • Dentist supplies (see dramatic play)
  • Several bottles of glue and many one inch squares of white paper

Vocabulary

  •  Cavity (A hole in your tooth)
  • Braces (Bands that go around your teeth to make them straighter)
  • Herbivore (animal or person who does not eat any meat)
  • Omnivore (an animal or person who eats both animal meat and plants)
  • Carnivore (an animal or person who only eats animal meat)
  • Rough (not smooth. bumpy)

Before Reading the Story

            Tell the children that your story today is about a special kind of career helper.  This person takes care of our teeth when they get sick with cavities.  Does anyone know who this career helper is?  Once the children have identified the helper as the dentist, let them talk of any dentist experiences they might have had.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, nedds, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Reading the Story

            As you read, point out different tools in the dentist office.  Have the children repeat back the names and then continue readind.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

After Reading the Story

            When you get to the page where the dentist gives Little Critter a lollipop, ask the children if that is really a healthy food for their teeth?  Ask them what they think would be a healthier treat for their teeth. Talk to them about how sticky foods and sugars attach to your teeth and cause cavities. Ask the children if they know the most important thing they can do to keep their teeth healthy? (Brush after meals)

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities. AND Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment.

Discovery

            Ask your dentist for some old x-rays of your teeth.  These can be taped to the window or held up to the light.  Also bring in any teeth that you might have to share.  (Your own, shark, animal, tooth castings). An old cassette holder works well for holding small items (teeth) that you do not want the children to hold loose.  Put the teeth inside and tape it shut.  Show the picture of the different kinds of teeth (herbivore, omnivore, and carnivore). The children can then use a magnifying glass to compare the different kinds of teeth.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods/begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Music and Movement

            Teach the Tooth Brushing cadence.

Brush your teeth every day,

Up and down it is the right way.

Back and forth and circles too,

This is what we have to do.

Brush your teeth every day,

Up and down it is the right way.

(Children can act out the motions of brushing)

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; shows growing independence in hygiene, nutrition, and personal care when eating, dressing, washing hands, brushing teeth, and toileting.

Make a large copy of the poem, My Mouth and hang it on the wall. Teach the children the poem while pointing out the various types of teeth.

My Mouth

My incisors are for biting

My canines are for tearing

My molars are for munching,

And my smile is for sharing.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses and increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Blocks

            Tell the children that today they can pretend to be the denist and remove the plaque and sugars from the teeth. On some of the blocks, make a mark using a marker. These are the cavities that the dentist will have to remove. Give the children several different grits of sandpaper and allow them to sand of the marks.   Can they feel the different grits of sandpaper?  Introduce the words rough and smooth to the children.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships. AND Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Art

            Make several copies of the giant mouth pattern and cover with contact paper.  Put into the play dough center and let the children use the play dough to make teeth.  Count the teeth after they have finished. 

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Sand and water

            Put Styrofoam egg cartons that have been sanitized into the water table with some toothbrushes.  The children can pretend to brush the egg carton teeth.  Add a small bit of paint to act as food on the tooth and let the children scrub it off. 

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Library and Writing

            Give each child a giant mouth picture.  Ask them to write the letters of their names across the teeth and cut out the mouths. 

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors. AND Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name.

Dramatic Play

            Add several hand mirrors to the center and Popsicle sticks along with “office” kinds of materials. If available, add some rubber gloves, safety glasses and a smock. The children can play Dentist using a new Popsicle stick for each mouth that they look into. 

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex. AND Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops a growing awareness of jobs and what is require to perform them.

Math and Manipulatives

            Before beginning; have the children chant “Not a lot, just a drop.  Not a lot, just a drop”.  This chant works well for teaching children about glue and toothpaste amounts.  Give each child a bottle of glue and ten 1” squares of paper.  Draw a line onto another piece of paper.  Challenge the children to glue 5 squares above the line and 5 squares below the line.  As they glue have them chant’ “Not a lot, just a drop”.  Have them count the teeth/squares above the line, under the line, and all together.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increased abilities to combine, separate, and name “how many” concrete objects. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Outdoor Play

            Have the children use old tooth brushes and a bucket of water to practice tooth brushing motions on the sidewalk. The water dries quickly, which encourages the them to continue with the motions. For a dirty tooth effect, use chalk to draw the teeth, add cavities. This will take longer to clean off the sidewalk, hence more practice. If available, let the children use 2 minute timers while they play. 

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Transitions

            Ask the children to name foods that they crunch with their teeth.  Name a food that sticks to your teeth when you eat it.  Name a food that is healthy for your teeth.  Name a food that is unhealthy for your teeth. 

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Resources

Dear Parents,

            Today we read a story about going to the dentist.  Ask your child to talk about and share any memory they have of a dentist visit.  Remind them at bedtime how important it is to clean their teeth by brushing them well.  Brush your teeth together and model good brushing technique.

Check out the web site http://www.colgatebsbf.com They have information and a free booklet that you can send home to parents for adult education.