Go Away Big Green Monster! by Ed Emberley

            This fun book makes learning facial parts and colors easy.  This book can easily be made into a flannel board story for the children to enjoy over and over.

Materials

  • Paper plate per child
  • Styrofoam cup per child
  • Potting soil and a handful of grass seed per child.
  • Multiple colors of sidewalk chalk

Vocabulary

  • Imagination (to be able to see or think up things that are not really true or real)

Before Reading the Story

            Ask the children if they know what the word “imagination” means.  Talk about how sometimes we imagine things that are not really true or real.  Sometimes we might imagine that we are a superhero or a doctor but we are just pretending.  Sometimes we imagine scary things like monsters under the bed.  Let the children talk about some of their imaginary thoughts.  If the children do not begin their own talk, help them out by telling your own story (I used to imagine that there were snakes under my bed at night). 

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Reading the Story

            Have the children help with the line “Go away big green monster!”

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest in reading-related activities, such as asking to have a favorite book rea; choosing to look at books; drawing pictures based on stories; asking to take a book home; going to the library; and engaging in pretend-reading with other children.

After Reading the Story

            Play Big Green Monster says….  Touch your two long legs, your triangle shaped nose, your round knees, your two pointy elbows etc..

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Discovery

            Give each child a Styrofoam cup that they can draw a monster face on.  Then let the children fill it with potting soil and add some grass seed on top.  When the grass begins to grow, they will have their own monster heads to take home.  Observe and record how long it takes for the grass seed to grow.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means, including discussion, drawings, maps, and charts.

Music and Movement

            Teach the children the Scary Eyes poem.

See these big and scary eyes,

It’s a really big surprise

BOO!

Touch fingers to thumb to make two small circles. Put these by your eyes and say the poem slowly. At Boo! pop hands open.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities.

            Sing I’ve Got Two Eyes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyMRGeT_SRI

I’ve got two eyes, one two. 

They’re both the same size, one two

I’ve got two eyes and they’re both the same size.

I’ve got two ears, one two

They help me hear, one, two

I’ve got two ears and they help me hear.

I’ve got two hands to wave good-bye

I’ve got two arms to swing up high

I’ve got two knees as round as you please

I’ve got feet to walk down the street.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

            Sing Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4eueDYPTIg

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; participates actively in games, outdoor play, and other forms of exercise that enhance physical fitness.

Blocks

            Ask the children if they can build a house that is very dark inside.  Encourage them to include a door so that you can see how dark it is inside.

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop and follow through on plans.

Art

            Put out green finger paint.  Challenge the children to make a big green monster face.

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities to create drawings, paintings, models, and other art creations that are more detailed, creative, or realistic.

            Let the children paint a paper plate to be a monster head.  When it dries they can collage on the face.  Show them how to punch holes with a hole puncher across the top and use yarn or pipe cleaners for hair.  Have many colors of paper available for the children to cut out eyes, mouths, and noses.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Library and Writing

            Encourage the children to dictate and illustrate any monster story or dream story that they would like to share.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Sand and Water

            Add cornstarch and a small bit of water to the table today.  Explain to the children that sometimes it may appear to be one way but really it is not (The cornstarch looks like you should be able to pick it up but when you do it melts into and off of your hand). https://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/quicksand-goo/

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships.

Dramatic Play

            Put out dress ups of community helpers or ones that encourage the children to use their imaginations to be someone that they are not.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Math and Manipulatives

           Encourage the children to use any manipulative toy/s that you have that encourage them to sort by colors.

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; shows growth in matching, sorting, putting in a series, and regrouping objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size.

Outdoor Play

On the cement draw circles about six inches round. Have the children each color a circle using a variety of colors of chalk. When the circles are all colored in, have the children start at one end and jump from circle to circle naming the colors as they go.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks, activities, projects, and experiences.

Transitions

            As the children move to the next activity ask them to show you a body part they have two of, one of, many of, ten of or a body part that is big, small, on their front, on their back, etc.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Resources

Use for charting grass growth

The Handiest Things in the World, by Andrew Clements

Tools help make our jobs and lives easier.  This book shows how using our hands helped influence the invention of tools.

Materials

  • Several clothespins
  • A bowl full of puffballs or cotton ball

Vocabulary

  • Tools (tools are things we use to make our work easier or our lives nicer)
  • Calculator (a tool that helps to add or subtract numbers)

Introducing the Story

Hold up your hands and ask the children what these are (hands). Ask the children if they can name the parts of their hands (fingers, thumbs, palms, and knuckles). Tell the children that our hands are also tools. Ask them if they know what you mean when you say hands are tools (our hands can do many things to make our work easier or life nicer). Ask the children what kinds of things they can do with their hands. Read the back cover of the book out loud to the children and then introduce the book.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment

Reading the Story

As you read each page, say; “You can use your hands to do ______, or you can use this tool to make life easier/life nicer” Ask the children if they can name the tool on each page.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; shows increased awareness and beginning understanding of changes in materials and cause-effect relationships.

After Reading the Story

Ask the children if they can think of any other ways we use our hands as a tool. Are there tools to help your hands? (Rip paper-scissors, hold clothes together-buttons, write name-computer keyboard, and lock car doors by turning key-using key fob to lock).

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction and non-fiction books and poetry.

Music and Movement

Sing Rhyming Words Sound the Same (sung to Here We Go Loopty Loo)

Rhyming words sound the same (clap, clap)
Rhyming words sound the same (clap, clap)
Rhyming words sound the same (clap, clap)
Rhyming words sound the same.

Teacher singsongs a word (frog), children try to name words that rhyme with frog. Do simple rhymes such as cat, up, dot, top (children’s words do not have to be real, it is the effect of rhyming that you are looking for)

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing awareness of beginning and ending sounds of words.

Hand Movement poem, children do movements as poem suggests

Clap them, clap them, clap them so
Clap them high
Clap them low.
Clap them very fast and
Clap them very slow,
Clap them, clap them, out of sight.

Continue poem by rolling them, flapping them, wiggling them, and snapping them.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Discovery

Stamp pads or small cups of paint to make fingerprints. Add a magnifying glass to look at each child’s individual fingerprints (see your curls and swirls)

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Blocks

Put out any play tools that you have so the children can pretend to build or repair block structures. As they play, ask them if they can name the tool that they are using, show me how to use it.

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops a growing awareness of jobs and what is required to perform them.

Art

Put out several rulers, paper, and crayons. Encourage the children to experiment making lines and geometric shapes. Have them write their names on their paper. Crayons are tools to help us write and rulers are tools to help use make straight lines and to measure.

Literacy/Early Writing; experiments with growing number of writing tools and materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computers.

Sand and Water

Add watering cans to your water play today along pitchers and cups to pour and catch the water. Put lines on the cups so the children have to practice filling them just up to the line. You can also make water rainmakers by punching holes into the bottom of a plastic container, such as a clean cottage cheese container. If you have several containers punch a different number of holes in them so the children can experiment with how much water flows through.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Library and Writing

Help children to trace around their hand. Ask them to give you several ways they use their hands and write their responses under their handprint. (I eat, I feed the fish, I give my baby sister her toy when she drops it).

Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and in play.

Dramatic Play

Put out gloves for the children to practice putting on. If you have clothing with snaps, buttons, and zippers, put these out also and encourage the children o use their hands to get dressed all by themselves.

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks, activities, projects, and experiences.

Math and Manipulatives

Put two bowls on the table, one full of puffballs or cotton balls and the other empty. Challenge the children to use the clothespins to transfer the puffballs from one bowl to the other.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Outdoor Play

Encourage the children to use shovels today to dig in the dirt or sand.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Transitions

Play, 1-2-3, How Many Do You See? Make two fists and knock them together saying, “1-2-3, how many do you see”? As you say “do you see?” hold up 1-10 fingers depending upon your children’s counting abilities. Have the children take turns counting your fingers and them moving on to the next activity.

Mathematics/Number & Operation; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Dear Parent- today we read a book about how our hands and tools do work for us. As you go about your evening routine, make notes to your child about a tool that you are using to make your life easier or nicer. (I’m using the TV clicker to change the channels; I’m using the water knobs to fill your bath with hot water; I’m using my toothbrush to clean my teeth).