The Gingerbread Boy, by Paul Galdone

           A little old lady and a little old man always wanted a child.  One day the woman decides to bake a gingerbread boy.  The gingerbread boy has his own ideas and runs away.  Join in the chase with a delicious ending, at least for the fox.

Materials

            Sequins or small buttons

            Animal Crackers.

            Recopy poem and add animals

            Person shaped cookie cutter

            2 gingerbread boys to be used to measure

Vocabulary

  • Threshing (using the stick to separate the seeds from the stalk of the wheat)

Before Reading the Story

Hold up the cover of the book and read the title. Ask the children if they have ever seen a boy that looked like this? Can they guess what he is made of? Ask the children if they have ever heard a similar story (The GingerBread Man, The GingerBread Woman). If so, ask them if they can recall what happened in the story.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; progresses in abilities to initiate and respond appropriately in conversation and discussions with peers and adults.

Reading the Story

            When the gingerbread boy gets up and runs, ask the children why they think he would do that?  After each character/s begin to chase the gingerbread boy ask them if they think he will get caught.  When the gingerbread boy gets up on the foxes nose, ask the children what they think is going to happen.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in a bilities to retell and dictate stories from book sans experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

After Reading the Story

            Ask the children if they think the fox should have eaten the gingerbread boy, why or why not.  If you caught the gingerbread boy what would you do? Play What Would You Do with the children. Ask questions that ask the children to make judgement calls. What would you do if you were walking down the street and you found a cookie just lying on the ground? WOuld you eat it? What would you do if you were helping your neighbor sweep her sidewalk and she gave you a cookie when you were finished, would you eat it? What would you do if you were cleaning your room and you were looking under your bed and you saw a cookie, would you eat it? What would you do if I gave you a cookie and then your friend came over but did not get one? What would you do if you saw your cat playing with something and you went to see what and it was a cookie? Talk with the children about when it is safe to eat something and when it is not

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities.

Discovery

           Give each child several animal crackers/cookies. What shapes do you have? What color are they? What do they smell like? Are they hrd or soft when you bite? Does it make a sound when you bite it? Do you like the taste? Is it sweet or sour? Graph which children like animal crackers and those who do not.

Science/Scientific Methods & Skills; develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means, including discussion, drawings, maps, and charts.

Music and Movement

Cut out the pieces for the Runaway Cookies poem and present it to the children. Do a second time and let the children come and take the appropriate cookie off the board and act out it’s actions.

The cookie jar people hopped out one night, when the cookie jar lid was not on tight.

The gingerbread man opened his raisin eyes and looked about in a great surprise.

The frosted bunny twinkled his nose and dance around on his cookie toes.

The sugary duck began to quack and shook the sugar right off his back.

The cinnamon bear could only grunt, he was too fat to do a stunt.

The coconut lamb jumped so high, that her little tail nearly touched the sky.

The cookies were happy to be at play so they never went back to the cookie jar that day.

Language Development/Listening * Understanding;demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Blocks

            Line up 5 animals or people on the floor.  Ask the child which is first in line, last, which is in the middle, which is second.  Have the child name the animals or people (fireman, doctor, teacher, policeman, construction worker).

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Art

            Have the children roll out play dough and make gingerbread people.  Use the sequins or buttons to adorn them.

Creative Arts/Art; gains ability in using different art media and materials in a variety of ways for creative self expression and representation.

Sand and Water

            Water play today.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Control;demonstrates increasing capacity to follow rules and routines and use materials purposefully, respectfully, and safely.

Library and Writing

            Copy the gingerbread boy shape onto several manila files and cut out.  Let the children trace around them and cut them out.  Let them color them if they choose to.  Ask the children to pretend that the cookie becomes a real person, what would you name it, and what might you say to it?  Write their responses on the back.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer. AND Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and in play.

Math and Manipulatives

            Cut out the gingerbread cookies and let the children use them to measure strips of tape on the floor and objects around the room (the table is 8 gingerbread boys and 1 head long)

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; Shows progress in using standard and non-standard measure for length and area of objects.

Outdoor Play

            Have the children line up in a line and run around the playground staying in the line.  They can pretend to be the characters in the story.  Teacher is first and calls out “Run, run as fast as you can, you can’t catch me I’m the gingerbread boy!”

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; participates actively in games, outdoor play, and other forms of exercise that enhance physical fitness.

Transitions

Hand out the five cookie shapes from music to five children. Repeat the Runaway Cookie poem. When the child’s cookie type is called, they may transition to the next activity. Give to five more and continue until all the children have been called to transition.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multi-step directions.

Resources

The Handiest Things in the World, Andrew Clements

                  This book shows pictures of children using their hands for a variety of purposes and then the tools that were invented to do the same job.  This is an interesting book to use during a hand study and a useful book to introduce the concept of tools.

Materials

  • Several sets of chopsticks or unsharpened pencils to make chopsticks. See Dramatic Play.
  • Several calculators, the simpler the better.

Vocabulary

  • Tool (something you use to do work or a job easier)

Before Reading the Story

                  Play Put Your Hands on Your… which is like Simon Says. (Put your hands on your elbows, put your hands on your thighs, etc).

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multi-step directions.

Reading the Story

                  As you read the story, make sure to name the different tools on each page.  Give the children the opportunity to discuss the tools as you read.

Language Development/Speaking & Understanding; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

After Reading the Story

                  Ask the children if they can think of any other tools that they might use.  Talk about the importance of hands and how we need to take care of them by washing them and not putting them in our mouths.

Approaches to Learning/ Reasoning & problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem. AND Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules.

Discovery

                  Add magnifying glasses and encourage the children to look closely at their hands. (Do you see the little hairs?, watch the creases when you open and close your fingers slowly).  Help them to name the parts of the hands (palm, wrist, flanges, knuckles, cuticles, finger nails, vein under skin).

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary. AND Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge and respect for their bodies and the environment.

Music and Movement

                  Let the children experiment with instruments today.

Creative Arts/Music; experiments with a variety of musical instruments.

Do The Hand Chant.  Have the children do the actions to accompany words.

Wiggle them, wiggle them, wiggle them so.

Wiggle them high, wiggle them low.

Wiggle them fast and wiggle them slow.

Wiggle them wiggle them out of sight.

(Clap them, roll them shake them, snap them)

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions. AND Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities.

Blocks

                  Add several rulers to the center today.  As the children build, show them how to measure how tall or how long their structure is.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows progress in using standard and non-standard measures for length and area of objects.

Art

                  Trace around the childrens hands onto a piece of paper using a black marker. Trace their hands several times so that the hands overlap. Let the children use colored markers to fill in the spaces made by overlapping their hands.  For older children, encourage them to trace around their friends hand.

Literacy/Early Writing; experiments with a growing variety of writing tools and materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computers.

Sand and Water

                  Put out water today and containers to hold it and pour it.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Control; demonstrates increasing capacity to follow rules and routines and use materials purposefully, safely, and respectfully.

Library and Writing

                  Use crayons, markers, and colored pencils to practice writing names today.

Literacy/Early Writing; experiments with a growing variety of writing tools and materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computers. AND Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name.

Dramatic Play

                  Add some chopsticks to the center.  Try rubber banding the tops about an inch down to make it easier for the children to manipulate. ENcourage the children to try to pick up plastic foods and small items.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Math and Manipulatives

                  Add calculators today and show the children how to punch in different numbers.  Can they punch in the numbers as you recite their phone number?  Can they name the different numbers correctly?

Mathematics/Numbers & Operation; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination.

Outdoors Play

Put out lots of shovels for digging in the sandbox and also dirt. Give the children rakes to pull the dirt away from the hole. Talk about how shovels and rakes are handy tools. Talk about how by cooperating together the children can dig a really big hole.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; increases abilities to sustain interactions with peers by helping, sharing , and discussion.

Transitions

                  Have the children take turns picking a tool card and then see if they can act it out or tell it’s purpose.

Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb by Al Perkins

            Children enjoy all of the silly rhyming in this book while reviewing hands, fingers, and thumbs.

Materials

  • A paper divided into 10 places for fingerprints.

Vocabulary

  • Loop, whorl, and arch (kinds of fingerprints-see resources)

Before Reading the Story

            Show the children the front of the book and ask the children what the monkey is pointing to (his hand).  How many fingers are on his hand?  Have the children count with you and then count the fingers on one of their own hands.  Tell the children that you are going to play a number game.  Hold up a card with a number on it (1-5).  Ask the children to show you that many fingers.  Play for a few rounds until the children get tired of and then introduce the story.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Reading the Story

            Practice reading ahead of time so that when you read it, it flows likes a poem or song. Throughout the story pause occasionally and see if the children can pick up on the rhyming word to end a sentence.

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; progresses in recognizing matching sounds and rhymes in familiar words, games, stories, and poems.

After Reading the Story

            Go over the parts of a hand with the children.  Name and point to each part.  Have the children show you on their own hands. (palm, fingernail, cuticle, knuckle, joint).

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Discovery

            Encourage the children to look at their hands through a magnifying glass.  Examine the fingernails and the palms of the hand.  Can the children identify which type of fingerprint they have by looking at the loop, whorl, and arch picture?

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships.

Music and Movement

            Put out your instruments today, especially any drums you have.

Creative Arts/Music; experiments with a variety of musical instruments.

            Teach the poem, Wiggle Them.  The children can do the actions as you say the poem.

Clap them, clap them, clap them so

Clap them high, clap them low.

Clap them very fast, and Clap them very slow,

Clap them, clap them out of sight.

Wiggle them…

Snap them…

Roll them…

Shake them…

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions. AND Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

            Sing Open Shut Them https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNaiU0jAgbI

Open shut them,

Open shut them

Give a little clap.

Open shut them

Open shut them

Lay them in your lap.

            Sing Where is Thumkin? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCTUHe8juoE

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Blocks

            Ask the children if they think that it would be easy or difficult to build without thumbs. Then have them give it a try. Remind them that without thumbs many things would be difficult to do. Can the children help think of any? (brushing teeth, coloring, zipping, eating)

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment.

Art

            Bring out more ink pads and let the children do finger print art.  They can make patterns or you can have them decorate a tree (their fingerprints are the leaves), the inside of a flower (their fingerprints are the center), or whatever you decide depending on the season.

Creative Arts/Art; gains ability in using different art media and materials in a variety of ways for creative expression and representation.

Library and Writing

Put out pictures of animals using their hands/paws to do things. Talk with the children about what the animal is doing and how they are different and similar to people.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Sand and Water

            Today would be a good day to have the children review their hand washing technique.  Call each child up to the sink and add a small amount of glitter to their hands.  Have them scrub their hands clean.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; shows growing independence in hygiene, nutrition, and personal care when eating, dressing, washing hands, brushing teeth, and toileting.

Dramatic Play

            Add gloves to the center.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing patterns and shapes, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Math and Manipulatives

            Explain to the children that every person has their own set of fingerprints that are like no one else’s.  Have the children press their fingers and thumb one at a time onto a stamp pad and then carefully and firmly press down on a piece of white paper. Let them compare how theirs is like or different from their friends.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences.

Outdoor Play

            Play Elbow to Elbow.  Pair the children up.  Call out a body part and the children in the pair must touch theirs together (elbow to elbow, hip to hip, finger to finger).

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Transitions

            Name a body part and have the child point it out on their body.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment.

Resources

squirrel
sloth
pig
raccoon
chimpanzee
lemur
elephant
bat
cat