Jump, Frog, Jump! by Robert Kalan

            This is a build upon story.  Older children will be able to follow along with the verse.  In this story the frog is pursued by many predators who would like to eat him for lunch.  How will he ever stay safe?

Materials

  • Flannel pieces/fly, fish, jumping frog, snake, turtle, basket, boy
  • Frogs numbered 1-10
  • Jump frog jump path/maze page
  • Frog cycle cards
  • Cornstarch packing noodles (ask your director to save all packing noodles that come with children’s materials and check to see if they are cornstarch based.
  • Small aquarium net or other small net like tool.
  • Tiddlywinks or poker chips

Vocabulary

  • Carnivore (one who eats meat or animals)

Before Reading the Story

Hold up a picture of a pond and ask the children if anyone knows what this is? Ask the children if any of them have ever been to visit a pond? Allow the children to share their pond experiences. What did you see at the pond? Did you hear any animal sounds? Tell them that your story today takes place at a pond. Introduce the story.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Reading the Story

            As you read, put up the flannel board pieces so the children can recall the chorus lines of this story.

Literacy/Early Writing; develops understanding that writing is a way of communicating for a variety of purposes. AND Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

After Reading the Story

            Talk about the sequence of events.  Why were the fish, the snake, and turtle chasing the frog? (They wanted to eat him).  Tell the children that the fish, the snake, and the turtle were all carnivores because carnivores eat meat or animals.  Ask them who else in the story was a carnivore? (the frog, he wanted to eat the fly.  And the boys are carnivores too although I doubt they wanted to eat the frog).

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Discovery

            Bring in pictures of real frogs.  Talk about the frog’s appearance. ( frogs have smooth skin, frogs have strong back legs so they can jump, A frog has big eyes that sit on top of his head, frogs have webbed feet to help them be better swimmers, frogs must live near water, a frog has a long sticky tongue to catch insects for lunch).

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

            Make the frog cycle cards and encourage the children to put them into proper order.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means, including discussion, drawings, maps, and charts.

Music and Movement

            Sing Mmm-ahh Went the Little Green Frog https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwU3beZ9kcw

Mmm-ahhh went the little green frog one day

Mmm-ahh went the little green frog.

Mmm-ahh went the little green frog  one day

And they all went went Mmm-ahh.

Language development/Speaking & Understanding; progresses in clarity of pronunciation and towards speaking in sentences of increasing length and grammatical complexity.

            Make about 10 of the large frogs.  Number them 1-10 and tape them to the floor touching front to back.  Make a lily pad by cutting out a circle and tape it to the floor in front of the number one frog.  Show the children how to do a standing long jump.  Let them see how far they can jump on the frog measuring tape.  Record their scores.

Mathematics/Patterns & measurement; shows progress in using standard and non-standard measures for length and area of objects.

Blocks

Ask the children to make a simple pond using the blocks. Then show them how to play tiddlywinks and flip the tiddlywink/chip into the pond. This takes practice to get the correct amount of pressure to fli[ the tiddlywink. (Put one tiddlywink/poker chip flat on the ground. Use the other to put pressure on the edge of the flattened one and pull back gently causing the flattened tiddlywink/poker chip to flip, hopefully into the pond.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer. AND Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks, activities, projects, and experiences.

Art

            Show the children the cover of the book and how the turtle is hiding within the pond grass.  Bring in cornstarch based packing noodles for the children to make 3 dimensional pond grass.  Put out a bowl with a little water in it.  Show the children how to dip the end of the noodle into the water (because it is a cornstarch base it will dissolve and the noodles will stick together).  Show the children how to dip and stick their noodles together to make a 3 dimensional shape.  When they are finished, let them dribble green paint over and it can be pond grass.

Creative Arts/Art; gains ability using different art media and materials in a variety if ways for creative expression and representation.

            Give the children long thin pieces of paper that are cut out to resemble snakes.  Let them use markers to decorate the snake.  Encourage them to add a pattern like the snake in the book. (I have used unifix cubes to make patterns for the children to follow).

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend patterns using a variety of materials.

Library and Writing

            Make a copy of the Jump Frog Jump page.  Cover it with contact paper and let the children use a washable marker to follow the frog’s path.  When they are done they can wipe it off with a damp cloth for another child to use.

Literacy/Early Writing; experiments with a growing variety of writing tools and ,materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computer.

Sand and Water

            Add any small pond animals that you might have to the water table.  Put out Tupperware lids that the children can pretend are lily pads.  Let them use a small aquarium net to try to catch the animals/fish. How many fish did you catch? How many frogs fit on the lilly pad?

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Dramatic Play

Math and Manipulatives

Mark a frog pond onto the floor or use a hoolahoop. Mark a line about 5 feet from the pond. Give a child 5 beanbags to try to throw into the pond. (Tell the children that the beanbag is a pretend frog that must try to jump into the pond). How many ‘frogs’ made it into the pond? How many did not? For older children you can give them a piece of paper that they can graph their results (2 in and 3 out of the pond). Have the children take turns throwing the bean bags into the pond.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use language to compare numbers of objects with terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, equal to. AND Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means, including discussion, drawings, maps, and charts.

Outdoor Play

            Play leap frog with the children.

Physical Health & Development/Gross Motor Skills; shows increasing levels of proficiency , control, and balance in walking, climbing, running, jumping, hopping, skipping, marching, and galloping.

Transitions

            As children go to the next activity sing or say;   Tell the children to crouch down on their haunches and listen for when their name is called.

Jeepers creepers look at all those leapers.

Jeepers creepers look at ____jump.

(The child named jumps off  and begin again with a different child)

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding simple and multiple-step directions.

Resources

for writing center
frog life cycle


About Kerry CI am an Early Childhood Educator who has seen daily the value of shared book readings with my preschoolers. I use the book theme in my centers and can daily touch upon a variety of Early Childhood Domains which makes assessing the children easy and individualized.