The Lion Who Had Asthma, by Jonathan London

This book helps children who have asthma, or know of someone with asthma, to know what symptoms and signs to look for to help lessen an asthma attack and how to stay calm. It introduces children to a nebulizer. Preschool aged children are twice as likely to have an emergency asthma attack as older children. Use this book to help alleviate some of the fear and questions that are part of asthma and asthma management.

Materials

  • Bubbles and bubble wands.  (Wands can be made by twisting pipe cleaners into a loop at one end)
  • Small paper lunch plates
  • Lion features
  • Paper straws, one per child
  • Cornstarch and green food dye.
  • 2 sets of the Water Cards
  • Is/Is Not boards and magnet letters

Vocabulary

  • Asthma (when air cannot get into your lungs and you have trouble breathing)
  • Inhaler (a machine that helps you breathe if you have asthma)
  • Imagination (to pretend something using your brain thoughts)
  • Imaginary (not real, pretend)

Before Reading the Story

Talk to the children about the importance of lungs.  Put your hands on your chest and tell the children that this is where your lungs are.  When your lungs are working properly, the air flows easily in and out.  Have the children hold the back of one of their hands near their mouth to feel how the air comes out.  Explain to the children that if you have asthma, that means your lungs make mucus which is thick and sticky making them feel tight and hard to breath.  It also makes you feel like coughing.  Explain that people with asthma can get help by using a special kind of machine called a nebulizer that has medicine inside and makes it easier for you to breath.  Tell the children that you cannot get asthma from another person.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Reading the Story

On the first page where Sean is a lion, tell the children that Sean is using his imagination.    On the page where he is a giant, ask the children if they know what the trees really are that he is munching on?  (Broccoli).  On the page where Sean makes a wheezing sound, demonstrate what a wheeze sounds like to the children.  Ask them to look at his face; it looks like he might be a little bit afraid.  On the next page where his mother tells him it’s time for a treatment, explain that people with asthma can use a special inhaler machine that they breath into and it helps make their lungs feel better.  On the page where Sean is able to breathe again, ask the children to look at his face now, he looks so much better and happier.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

After Reading the Story

In the story Sean was having trouble breathing, ask the children if they remember how that made him feel?  (He cried and coughed.  He was scared.  Sean used his imagination.  Ask the children to recall some of the things that Sean pretended to be.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Talk to the children about watching out for their friends.  Ask the children How they can help when they see a friend who is having trouble breathing? (tell an adult right away).  If a child in your class has asthma, remind them to let you know right away if they feel like they cannot breathe very well.  Ask the children to help you make a list of things that should be done if someone is having an asthma attack. (Relax & stay calm.  stop, sit down, relax, take quick-relief medication (if prescribed by the child’s physician), tell a friend or adult). Post the list on the wall.

Literacy/Early Writing; develops an understanding that writing is a way of communicating for a variety of purposes.

Discovery

At lunch or snack today, give each child a straw. Tell them that you want to show them what breathing with asthma might feel like. Tell the children to sit and use the straw to breath in and out. Can they feel how they are not getting as full of lungs? The air is not going in well. Take the straw out and try a few breaths. Feel the difference. Let the children use the straws for their milk or juice today.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; bgins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Music and Movement

Teach the children the chorus of That’s What Breathings All About https://www.sesamestreet.org/toolkits/asthma

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment.

The Water Song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvuhAVH-BU8

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment.

Blocks

Show the children how to make a maze with the blocks. Give them a puf ball or ping pong ball to try to blow through the maze.

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop follow through on plans.

Art

Give each child a small paper lunch plate to paint in shades of orange (set out orange, red, yellow, and white paint).  After the paper plate has dried, have the children glue on the lion’s eyes, nose, mouth, and ears (The teacher will probably need to cut out the shapes for younger children).   Draw on whiskers with a marker.

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities to create drawings, paintings, models, and other art creations that are more detailed , creative, or realistic.

Sand and Water

Make gooey mucus; Add one cup water, 2 cups cornstarch, and green food coloring.  Slowly mix this all together.  The mixture will appear solid but when you pick it up, it will ooze from your hand.  As the children play with the mucus, explain that this is like what happens in your lungs if you have asthma.  Have them pick up some of the goo.  Let it flow between your fingers, does it flow fast or slow?  If flows slow, that’s what happens in your lungs making it hard to breath.  Now add a few drops of water to the mucus.  Does it feel the same?  Does it flow through your fingers differently?  Explain to the children that it’s important to drink plenty of water as drinking lots of water thins the mucus and makes it easier to breathe.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Library and Writing

As children look a books today, ask them if the book they are looking at is fiction or not-fiction (Imaginary or not imaginary but real).

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction and non-fiction, and poetry.

Put out the magnet letters and is/is not boards for the children to use tofday.

Dramatic Play

Ask the children what they think they might like to imagine play today.  As their play progresses, check in and tell them you like how they are using their imagination to __________.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Math and Manipulatives

Make two sets of the water drinking cards. Make sure the children cannot see through the back. Use to play Memory. Turn all the cards face down on the table. The children take turns picking cards trying to find sets.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develop[s and increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns during games or using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive. AND Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks and activities.

Outdoor Play

Bring bubbles and wands out onto the playground today.  Show the children how to take a long slow breath out to make the bubbles.

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks and activities.

Remind the children when they are out running that it sometimes feels hard to breathe.  When this happens you need to slow down and catch your breath and grab a glass of water.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, amd responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, or activities.

Transitions

Play snake breath.  Have the children take a breath in and then very slowly let their breath out while making a hissing snake sound.  Who can make the longest hissing sound?

Resources

The CDC has put out information specifically for children.  https://www.cdc.gov/asthma/pdfs/kids_fast_facts.pdf

The Napping House, by Audrey Wood

            Naps are very important to help us grow.  This fun story is about a house that is napping, until a wakeful flea arrives, then everything goes crazy.

Materials

  • Copy of characters. Make into flannel pieces by covering with contact paper and taping to the board. Pictures come from; Projecto A casa sonolenta em LIBRAS

Vocabulary

  • Colored construction paper cut into one-inch lengths.
  • Construction paper that has been made into a weaving frame (see resources).

Before reading the story

            Hold up the cover of the book and say the title.  Ask the children why they think naps are important (we grow while we sleep, when we are tired we do not think as well, naps help us from getting crabby).  Talk about how the children sleep (Kerry always falls asleep first, Roger likes to read a book before he takes a nap, and Ryan you are usually the last to fall asleep).  Turn off the light if you have window light to darken the room slightly.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Reading the Story

            As you read the pages where everyone is sleeping, use a soothing voice and yawn as you turn the pages.  Point to each critter as they climb onto the bed.  When you get to the page where the flea bites the mouse, change your voice to one of surprise and a quicker pace.

After reading the story

            Ask the children if they noticed the flea in the first half of the story.  Go back through the pages and look for the flea.  Use the copy of the characters to put onto the bed in the correct order (Who was the first one on the bed?  Who was second, third, fourth, etc).

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress and abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Discovery

            If you have nesting toys these would be good to put into the center.  I use the Russian nesting dolls and talk about smallest, bigger, bigger, and largest.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows increasing abilities to match, sort, put in a series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size.

Music and Movement

            Put lullabies on during the day as background music.

Blocks

            Encourage the children to make a bed and load it up with animals.  How many animals can you get on the bed?  Can you put the cow on top of the tiger?

Mathematics/Number & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quantity.

Art

Make woven blankets. Fold a piece of construction paper in half the long length, one per child. Cut from the fold to approximately one inch from the outside edge. Open up, this is your weaving frame. Cut many one inch lengths of colored construction paper. Show the children how to take a length of colored paper and go under, over, under, over the weaving frame stripes. Take the next piece of colored paper and go over, under, over, under. Continue filling in the weaving frame.

Mathematics/Pattern & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Sand and Water

            Put out water and colanders or plastic containers with holes punched into the bottom to simulate rain.  Note that in the story it was raining outside the window. As they play, talk to them about rain. Talk about how it is important to be safe and come out of the rain if you hear thunder or see lightning.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities.

Library and Writing

            Give the children a piece of white paper and, tell them that you are going to tell them how to make a Mexican blanket.  Have them turn the paper the tall way (vertically).  On the top of the paper use a pencil and make an L on the left and an R on the right.  Model with your own piece of paper.  Tell, and show, the children to draw a blue dotted line from the left side to the right.  Next, tell and show them to draw a curly yellow line from the left side to the right.  Continue this using a variety of colors and different kinds of lines until they have filled their paper.  Use words that describe lines as you model ( dotted line, curly line, zig-zag line, straight line, thick line, wavy line). 

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary. AND Language Development/Listening & Understanding; show progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions, AND Literacy/Early Writing; experiments with a growing variety of writing tools and materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computers.

Dramatic Play

            Use boxes and blankets to make beds.  Add stuffed animals. Encourage the children to act out the story.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress and abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Outdoor Play

            Tell the children that you are going to play a game of night and day.  Have the children sit in a circle.  Stand in the middle of the circle, holding your arms out and your hands up with your fingers spread.  Tell the children that your hands are the sun and when the sun is shining on them they are awake.  If your hands are not shining on them they are to pretend that they are asleep.  Slowly start turning in the circle and help them get the rhythm of the game.  As they are able to wake and sleep while you turn, speed up and slow down and see if they can keep up with your rhythm.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities.

Transitions

Put a piece of tape on the backs of each of the napping house figures. Ask a child to put the dog over the cat or the grandmother under the mouse. Each child can have a turn moving pieces as they go to the next activity.

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; builds an increasing understanding of directionality, order, and positions of objects, and words such as up, down, over, under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front, behind.

Resources

Abiyoyo, by Pete Seeger

Children always seem to delight in this scary story about a giant that comes to town and a small boy who thinks outside the box to save the people.

Materials

  • 2-3 flashlights
  • Bubbles and a bubble blower
  • Several small bars of soap, like the kind you would get in a hotel, or soft soap.
  • 8-10 small boxes (shoe box sized and smaller)
  • 2-4 dozen rubber bands big enough to fit snugly around the largest of your small boxes
  • Paint brushes and buckets

Vocabulary

  • Ukulele (an instrument kind of like a little guitar)
  • Ostracized (to be kicked out or excluded from the group)
  • Precious possessions (most important and loved things)
  • Disappear (make something vanish or go away)
  • Brave (to challenge something and show courage doing so)
  • Hygiene (how to keep oneself clean)

Before Reading the Story

Ask the children if they know what the word brave means. Explain that being brave means doing something even if it feels scary. Ask the children if they can think of any time that they were brave. (I stayed in my bed when there was thunder, I rode my bike on two wheels and fell down but now I can do it, I climbed to the top of the bars). Introduce the story by telling the children that it is about a very brave boy and his father who saved the whole town from a scary giant named Abiyoyo.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.  AND  Language Development/Speaking and Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied spoken vocabulary.

Reading the Story

As you read, stop and ask the children how the townspeople are feeling on different pages. Why do you think they are feeling that way?

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; progresses in responding sympathetically to peers who are in need, upset, hurt, or angry; and in expressing empathy and caring for others.

Encourage the children to join in with you singing Abiyoyo, Abiyoyo. Become more vibrant, loud, and bouncy until you finally stop abruptly to end the story.

Literacy/Book Knowledge and Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

After Reading the Story

Talk to the children about what Abiyoyo looked like. Did he have good hygiene? What should you do to keep your fingernails from getting long and dirty? How do you keep your feet from getting all stinky? When is it important to wash your hands, why? Ask the children why they think it is important to bath? Explain to  them that when they are clean, other people enjoy more to be around them.

Physical Health and Development/Health Status & Practices; shows growing independence in hygiene, nutrition, and personal care when eating, dressing, washing hands, brushing teeth, and  toileting.

Discovery

Try doing shadow play today. Shine a flashlight on the wall and let the children try making hand shadows or whole body shadows. Does it make a difference if there is a lot of light in the room, if you stand in front or behind the light? Can you make a whole body shadow or an animal using your hands?

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Music and Movement

Put on some classic guitar music and have an air band while you play and dance to the music.

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plays, games, and performances.

Sing  Momma Don’t Allow No Guitar Playing Around Here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-ODoOHoNyQ

Momma don’t allow no guitar playing around here.
Momma don’t allow no guitar playing around here.
I don’t care what Momma don’t allow
Gonna play my guitar any how
Momma don’t allow no guitar playing around here.

(Momma don’t allow no hand clapping, jumping, foot stomping, etc.)

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Encourage the children to clap out the syllables as they sing Abiyoyo. Start slowly and then speed up.

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing ability to hear and discriminate separate syllables in words.

 Blocks

Challenge the children to build something really gigantic out of the blocks today. If using wooden blocks, remind them about any height rule you may have.

Physical Health and Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in eye-hand coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Art

Encourage the children to draw big scary giants. Older children might enjoy drawing different parts of the story.  Remind them about the giant in the story, can they draw slobbery mouths and dirty fingernails?

Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and in play.   Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest in reading related activities, such as asking to have a favorite story read, choosing books to look at, drawing pictures based on stories, and engaging in pretend reading with other children.

Sand and Water

Encourage the children to take turns practice washing their hands so they don’t get all yucky like Abiyoyo. Talk about the importance of hand washing and when children should wash their hands.

Physical Health and Development/Health Status & Practices; shows growing independence in hygiene, nutrition, and personal care when eating, dressing, washing hands, brushing teeth, and toileting.

Library and Writing

Paint with water on the sidewalk. The water will disappear. Can you write your name with this magic water paint before it disappears?

Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their name.

Dramatic Play

Add a stringed instrument and a magic wand to the center. Encourage the children to act out the story.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Math and Manipulatives

Put out a variety of small boxes, minus the tops. Show the children how to wrap rubber bands around the box and make plunking instruments. Do all the boxes make the same sound?

Scientific/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences, and comparisons among objects and materials.

Outdoors Play

Take some bubbles outside today. The teacher can blow the bubbles and children can use a small stick or their finger to pretend to be a wand a “zoop”/pop the bubbles to make them disappear.

Physical Health and Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in eye-hand coordination used in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Transitions

Play “which is” during transitions today. Ask the children, which is… bigger, louder, scarier, taller, etc. depending upon the age of your children. Which is bigger, a cat or a goat? Which is taller a person or a house?

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences.  AND  Mathematics/Patterns & Measurements; begins to make comparisons between several objects based on a single attribute.

Dear Parent,  It is important for children to learn to bath and clean themselves independently. As you go through your evening routines with your child, monitor his/her washing and brushing and give encouragement as they practice these skills. When they are all clean and ready for bed, comment on how nice and clean they smell.