Every Buddy Counts, by Stuart J. Murphy

            What do you do when you wake up feeling lonely, crummy, yucky, and sad?  Count your friends and you will feel better!  This is a nice counting book to share with your children.

Materials

  • Rebus Gorp recipe card
  • Gorp ingredients for the class
  • Dice
  • Felt shapes and a flannel board

Vocabulary

  • More (to have extra, or spare)
  • Less (fewer)

Before Reading the Story

            Do several fingerplays or songs that you know that require some counting (5 Little Ducks, 1,2,3,4,5 I Caught a Fish Alive).

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count to 10 and beyond.

Reading the Story

            As you read the book, stop and have the children help count (Example; On the page for 7, count the aunts and uncles and the cars.  Are there more people or more cars?  On the eight page after counting the playmates, ask what the girl is holding in her hand, What is it used for?).

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND begins to use language to compare numbers if objects in terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, equal to.

After Reading the Story

            Bring in a dice.  Take turns rolling the dice and having the children count how many dots.  Then let the child choose a movement for everyone to do that many times. (Kerry you rolled 3.  Kerry wants to do 3 kicks, everybody kick and count 1,2,3.).

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more that one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Discovery

            Make gorp using the rebus cards to count out ingredients.

Literacy/Early Writing; develops understanding that writing is a way of communicating for a variety of purposes.

Music and Movement

            Have the children start in a squatting position and begin to count 1-10.  As they count, they begin to stand up slowly until they get to 10 and are on tip toe with hands in the air.  Now start a 10 and work down to 1 getting smaller and smaller as they count.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count to 10 and beyond.

            Teach the children the finger play 1,2,3,4,5 I Caught a Fish Alive.

            1,2,3,4,5                                    Hold up fingers as you count

            I caught a fish alive                      Point towards yourself

            6, 7, 8,9,10                                Hold up fingers as you count

            Then I threw him back again!        Pretend to throw fish

            What made you let him go?          Shrug shoulders up

            Because he bit my finger so!          Hands on hips with mad face

            Which finger did he bite?              Look of  surprise

            The little pinkie on the right         Hold up little pinkie and look sad

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Blocks

            Challenge the children to make a set of stairs using 10 blocks.  What else can you make using only 10 blocks?

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more that one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Art

            Have the children trace around their hands, or they can trace around their friends hands.  Encourage them to embellish their hands with fingernails, rings, and bracelets or watches at the wrist.  When they are finished decorating their hands, show them how to write the numbers 1-10 and put a number above each finger.

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities to create drawings, paintings, models, and other art creations that are more detailed, creative, or realistic.

Library and Writing

            Put out a variety of flannel board shapes and let the children make patterns or count.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurements; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials.

Sand and Water

            Put sand or water in the table.  Ask the children to use a measuring cup and count how many scoops it takes to fill a bowl.  Use several size measuring cups and a variety of containers to fill.  Which containers hold the most?  Which container holds the least?

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use language to compare numbers if objects in terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, equal to.

Math and Manipulatives

            Make a counting book with the children.  Give each child a paper with a number on it.  The children can draw or cut out pictures of objects to represent their number.  Do numbers 1-10.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Dramatic Play

            Have the children set the table for two, three, and four.  They will have to count to make sure they have enough dishes and silverware.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop and follow through on plans.

Outdoor Play

            Play Mother-May-I.  All the children stand at one side of the area.  The children take turns asking “Mother may I take (3) (jumps)?  Mother then says yes, or no you may only take (2) jumps.  The children work there way across to the other side of the play yard counting different movements. (Slides, tippy toe walks, giant steps, skips, jumps, twirls).

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Transitions

            Have the children count how many steps it takes to get from point A to point B.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count to 10 and beyond.

Resources

The Doorbell Rang, by Pat Hutchins

Materials

  • Cookie page cut out
  • A small box of cookies, enough for 1-2 per child
  • small drinking cups and spoons for mixing
  • Large zip-lock of cornstarch, flour, salt, dirt, sand, etc.
  • Small pitcher of water

Vocabulary

  • Tea (a hot drink that people like with cookies)
  • Starving (really, really hungry)
  • Enormous (really, really big-huge)
  •  Fair (to do according to the being nice rules)

Before Reading the Story

Ask the children if they have ever helped their parent to bake. What did they help to bake? Do they remember the steps that they took? Give the children a moment to talk about any experience they may have had and then tell them that you are all going to make pretend cookies. Have the children act out the following; Get your bowl and place it in your lap. Pour in 2 cups of flour. Break in 4 eggs. Stir your batter. Add a little milk and stir some more. Tell the children if they want chocolate chip cookies, now would be the time to pour them in. Stir your pretend batter one more time and then scoop from the bowl how many children you have today (ie 17). Pretend to put the cookies in the oven, remind the children to be safe as the oven is hot. While your pretend cookies are baking, sing C is For Cookie. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye8mB6VsUHw. Can the children think of other words that start with C? Sing about several other items also. Now tell the children that the cookies are done, can you smell them? They smell delicious. Have the children pretend to take them out of the oven and eat one. What kind of cookie did each child make? Ask them to share one with their neighbor. Remind them to thank each other for sharing their yummy pretend cookies with each other.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play;participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Reading the Story

                  Each time you say “No one makes cookies like Grandma” have the children make a doorbell sound (ding-dong).  When you get to the page where each child has only one cookie on their plate and the doorbell rings, ask the children why everyone was looking at the door but not answering it.

Language/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems. And Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem-Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences.

After Reading the Story

                  Talk to the children about sharing.  Bring in a box of real cookies and divide them equally among the children.  Break some in half if you have to make sure everyone gets the same amount.  Talk about being fair and even.  Give some examples of when children have done something fair.  (Roger was being really fair at breakfast when he only filled his juice cup to the line so that there would be some for the next person.  Kerry was fair when she let Tammie in line because Tammie’s name was called first.

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; shows progress in developing friendships with peers. AND Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Discovery

Cover the science table with newspaper. Put out the small cups and spoons. Show the children how to scoop a small amount of flour, etc. into their cup and add abit of water. Stir it around. What happens to the flour? Try adding a bit of water to a variety of substances. Do they become sticky, runny, thick? Let the children play with mixing different substances for different results. Pretend that you are mixing cookie doughs.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences, and comparisons among objects and materials.

Music and Movement;

                  Play Count and Shout with the children.  Call out an action command and a number.  The children then must do the action while counting.  (Hop on both feet three times! 1-2-3. Flap your arms like a bird 5 times!  Jump like a frog 3 times!  Clap your hands 4 times!  Lift your knees 6 times!)

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Use 5 of your Chocolate Cookie cut-outs to do the following poem. Have the children act out.

Five Chocolate Chip Cookies

Five chocolate chip cookies, which I adore,

In came my mother, and then there were four.

Four chocolate chip cookies, that’s plenty for me,

Oh!  Here comes my father, now there’s just three.

Three chocolate chip cookies, they’ll have to do,

Oh no!  Here comes my brother, now there’s just two!

Two chocolate chip cookies, I better grab and run!

Too late! Sister is here and now there’s just one.

One little chocolate chip cookie, well its better than none.

I’ll take tiny little nibbles, that will be more fun!

Yum, yum

            Play, Who Stole the Cookies from the Cookie Jar?

Who stole the cookies from the cookie jar?

(Name a child) stole the cookies from the cookie jar.

Who me?  Yes you.  Couldn’t be.

Then who stole the cookies form the cookie jar?

(Name another child) stole the cookies from the cookie jar.

Who me?  Yes you.  Couldn’t be.

Then who……..

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Blocks

                  As the children build with blocks today, ask them to add one more, three more, zero more blocks to their building.  Watch to see if they know how many objects make up a number.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increases abilities to combine, separate and name “how many” concrete objects.

Art

                  Tell the children that you are going to pretend to make sugar cookies. Cut out 6 inch circles from poster board or heavy construction paper. Give the children light brown paint with salt mixed in and have them paint their cookie shapes. Ask the children what they think the salt is doing to the paint? As the paint dries, the salt will sparkle.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; shows increased awareness and beginning understanding of changes in materials and cause-effect relationships.

Library and Writing

                  Make your own The Doorbell Rang book.  Ask each child to draw a picture of someone, or something, inside the door frame paper.  Attach a door to the front of each child’s page and the words Ding-Dong.  Put all the pages together into a classroom book. As you read it, say DIng-Dong and then open the door and tell who, what is there. (Ding-Dong, Alicia was at the door. Come on in! Ding-Dong, an elephant was a the door. Come on in!).

Literacy/Early Writing;begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictations, and in play.

Sand and Water

Fill your table up with warm water and soap today. Explain that after one bakes, one must wash the dishes. Add some play dishes, bowls, and spoons.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities.

Dramatic Play

Ask the children if they can remember what the mom was doing in the story (mopping the floor)? If you have access to a child’s sized mop, let the children try their hand at this chore. Also small brooms for sweeping.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities.

Math and Manipulatives

                  Encourage the children to use materials and divide them equally among themselves.  Card games are good for this as you must go around the circle, one for you, one for you, one for you, and one for me.  One for you, one for you, one for you, and one for me.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Outdoor Play

                  Add a little water to the dirt and let the children make mud cookies.  Let them use old cookie sheets or trays to put them on.  They can use natural materials to decorate their cookies.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Transitions

                  Talk to the children about what it means to have more, less, or equal amounts.  Ask the children to each grab a handful of a manipulative (unifix, chains, bears).  Have them count the number of manipulatives they were able to pick up with one hand.  Ask the first child if they or the person beside them has more.  Whoever has more may move to the next activity.  Next ask a child who has less, themselves or the person beside them.  Whoever has less may go to the next activity.  If both children have an equal amount, they may both go.  Continue until everyone has moved to the next activity.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use language to compare numbers of objects with terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, equal to.

Resources

A Cake All For Me!, by Karen Magnuson Beil

Pig is making a cake, all for himself but just as he is about to eat it some friends stop by. Will he share his cake with his friends? Count along to find the answer.

Materials

  • White cake mix
  • Bag of chocolate chips
  • Assorted colors of food coloring
  • A plastic spoon and cup for each child
  • Flour sifters and egg whips
  • Graters and a bag of carrots
  • 3 empty one gallon milk jugs and cups for pouring and scooping.
  • An index card for each child with their name printed on it.

Vocabulary

  • Share (to let somebody use something, to give part of what you have to someone else)

Before Reading the Story

Ask the children if they know what it means to share. Give examples of how you have seen the children share among themselves over the last day or two (I remember yesterday when Roger shared his markers with Kerry, that was being a good friend. I liked when I saw Sean let Alison have a turn on the bike).

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; shows increasing abilities to use compromise and discussion in working, playing, and resolving conflicts with peers.

Reading the Story

Practice reading the story beforehand so that you have a nice rhythm as this is written in poem form. Point out some of the actions as you read. Also stop after 1,2, get out the moo. Ask the children if they think they know what ‘moo’ means in the story.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction and non-fiction, and poetry.

After Reading the Story

Ask the children if Pig was a good friend, why? Talk about the importance of sharing. Tell the children sometimes it is hard to share but when you do it lets another person know you are friends.

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; shows progress in developing friendships with peers.

Discovery

Make up the white cake mix according to directions. Scoop it into equal portions to make one plastic cup per child. Ask each child what color cake they would like to make. Drop the appropriate food coloring into their mix and give them a spoon to mix well. Have each child count out 5-10 chocolate chips and drop them into their batter. Continue to mix. Have a cupcake pan/s ready. The children (you may have to help) scoop their batter into a cupcake pan to make a class cake. Cook and cool before eating. If you like you can spread with a thin layer of cool whip as frosting. Yummy

Mathematics/Numbers & Operations; develops increasing ability to count in sequence to 10 and beyond.   

Music and Movement

Sing 1 Little 2 Little 3 Little children (sung to 1 Little 2 Little 3 Little Indians)

1 little 2 little 3 little children
4 little 5 little 6 little children
7 little 8 little 9 little children
10 children baking a cake! Yum!

Then count down 10-1 eating the cake! Yum!

Hold up fingers as you sing the numbers.  Mathematics/Numbers & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and beginning to match sets.

Do Patty Cake Patty Cake with the children but change out the letter to match children’s names and see if they can fill in the name where you would have said “For baby and me”.   With children who are just learning to recognize letters, make the letter sound also so the children can hear the letter sound before they guess.

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; associates sounds with written words, such as awareness that different words begin with the same sound.

Blocks

Bring in a pan from the dramatic center and encourage the children to make a stove/oven that they can bake a cake in.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem-Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Art

Get out the play dough and your cookie cutters to pretend making cookies. Put out pieces of cardboard to put the cookies on so they can go in the oven.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Sand and Water

Put sifters in to the table with sand. Also egg whips, measuring cups, and several bowls.  Encourage the children to pretend to be bakers making a cake.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Library and Writing

Ask the children if they have a favorite recipe. Ask them how it is made, dictate their directions onto a piece of paper. They can then go through magazines to see if they can find their favorite food. Let them cut it out and glue it to their recipe.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; progresses in abilities to initiate and respond appropriately in conversation and discussions with peers and adults.  AND Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and play.

Dramatic Play

Encourage the children to pretend to bake or cook a yummy treat. Add the book to the center as a reference guide. Or add a cookbook that has many pictures of food.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games and using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.

Math and Manipulatives

Bring in several graters and a bag of carrots for the children to try their hand at grating.  Remind them to be careful to not grate too close to the end or they might scrape their knuckles.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in eye-hand coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing patterns and shapes, stringing beads, and using scissors.  AND Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; shows growing capacity to maintain concentration over time on a task, question, set of directions or interactions, despite distractions or interruptions.

Outdoor play

Put the empty milk jugs into the sand box along with a variety of cups to scoop and pour. Challenge the children to pour the sand into the jugs and count how many scoops it took ( 16 cups=gallon, 8 pints=gallon)

Mathematics/Number & operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quantity.

Transitions

Write each child’s name on an index card.  Tape the index cards onto the wall in front where the children can clearly see the names.  Tell the children that you are going to pretend that this is a delicious cake.  Now teach your children the following poem;  Down around the corner at the bakery shop, there was a beautiful cake with icing on top.  Along came (child’s name) all alone, and she took a piece of cake and then went home.  The child then comes up and finds their name among the names hanging on the wall.

Literacy/Print awareness; recognizes a word as a unit of print, or awareness that letters are grouped together to form words, and words are separated by spaces.

Dear Parent- Today we read a story about a pig who got to bake a cake.  Find a time this week when your child can help cook something in the kitchen.  It can be as simple as pouring milk into cereal or as complicated as baking and frosting a cake. Not only is it fun but following a recipe requires math skills and watching a cake rise in the oven involves science!