Icy Watermelon-Sandia Fria, by Mary Sue Galindo

This bilingual story is about a family that delights in sharing watermelon and happy memories. Just a reminder that generational stories are lovely to share.

Materials

  • Watermelon, whole
  • One sharp knife and small plastic ones for each of the children.
  • 2 pillow cases
  • Rebus How to make a watermelon slice****

Vocabulary

  • Abuelo/Abuela (Spanish for grandfather/grandmother)
  •  Harvest ( to pick the fruit/vegetable when it is ripe/ready)
  •  Barrios (neighborhoods)
  • Sandia Fria (icy watermelon)

Before Reading the Story

            Come to the rug today and act excited.  Tell the children that you have a surprise for them today. (Make sure the children can not see the watermelon or the book until after you have introduced the story).  Tell the children that you do not think they can guess it.  Let several children respond then say “It’s big and round, and it’s green on the outside.”  Let the children continue to guess.  Then tell the children that it is something that you eat and it has black seeds on the inside and is very juicy.  Continue to let the children guess.  If they still do not get the correct answer tell them watermelon.  Show the children the cover of the book and introduce.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Reading the Story

You will want to practice reading this book ahead of time as there are words in Spanish. In order to keep the children interested you do not want to be tripping over words.

After Reading the Story

            Ask the children if their parents ever share any stories about when they were little?  If not, share one about yourself.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes. AND Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops ability to identify personal characteristics, including gender and family composition.

Discovery

            Bring in a watermelon.  Have the children describe the watermelons outside.  What color is it?  Does it smell?  Can you lift a watermelon?  After the children have described the outside of the watermelon (make sure you record their observations on a piece of paper), cut the watermelon open.  Cut the watermelon into slices and then let the children use the plastic knives to cut it into pieces.  Again have the children describe the watermelon using their senses.  Graph those who like watermelon and those who do not.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means, including discussion, drawings, maps, and charts. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Music and Movement

            Tell the children that you are going to pretend to grow watermelon seeds.  First you have to dig a little hole and cover it with dirt.  Ask the children if they know how watermelons grow.  Explain that they grow on a vine.  Have the children pretend to be the seed and sprout from the dirt.  Tell them that a vine grows long against the ground.  Now tell them that they are the watermelons out in the field.  You are going to come and pick them and put them in the truck.  The children must try to stay a nice tight watermelon ball while you move them around, lift them, and put them in a group/pile.  Encourage the children to keep their bodies curled up and tight.  Once you have collected all the watermelons, tell the children that now they are the farmers and let’s drive our watermelons to the market to sell.  Pretend to drive.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; progresses in physical growth, strength, stamina, and flexibility. AND Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Teach the children the song, Down by the Bay.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-CSxGHve60E           

Down by the bay, where the watermelon grow,

Back to my home, I dare not go.

For if I do, my Mother would say,

Have you ever seen a bear in his underwear?

Down by the bay.

(a snake baking a cake, a dog sitting on a log, a mouse in a purple house)

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; progresses in recognizing matching sounds and rhymes in familiar words, games, songs, stories, and poems.

Blocks

Put out your play people today and watch what the children have them say and/or do.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Art

Ahead of time, cut out one large circle out of a manilla file/cardboard and one slightly smaller circle. Have the children trace the large circle onto green paper and the smaller circle onto red paper.Have the children cut out one large green circle.  Have them cut out one red circle slightly smaller. Glue the red circle onto the green. Use the seeds from the watermelon to glue onto the red circle.  How many seeds does your watermelon slice have?

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing, and art tools, including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes, and various types of technology. AND Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Library and Writing

            Say the word watermelon to the children.  Ask them if they can hear the two words that make up watermelon (water+melon).  Work with the children to think of more words that are made from two words combined (butterfly, basketball, campground, flashlight, underwear, dishwasher).

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows increasing ability to discriminate and identify sounds in spoken language.

Sand and Water

            Add red food coloring to the water just for fun. Then give the children a choice of what the would like to use in the water today.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Dramatic play

            Encourage the children to pretend to be the grandparents who come to visit.  Have the children sort the play  fruits to make a pretend fruit salad.

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families and Communities; progresses in understanding familiarities and respecting differences among people, such as genders, race, special needs, culture, language, and family structures.

Math and Manipulatives

Draw a half of a watermelon onto a large sheet of paper. Bring a dice and black marker to the table. The children take turns rolling the dice and then adding that many dots (seeds) to the watermelon. Let each child have several turns before including new children.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Social & Emotional Development/ Cooperation; develops abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games and using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.

Outdoor play

            A watermelon weighs about 20 pounds when it is fully grown.  Fill a pillowcase with about 15-20 pounds of sand and tie it off.  Let the children try to carry the pillow case around the playground.  Or bring in two and have a relay race.  Do you think it would be hard or easy to pick watermelons all day long?

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; progresses in physical growth, strength, stamina, and flexibility. AND Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; demonstrates growing confidence in a range of abilities and expresses pride in accomplishments.

Transitions

Make a graph= I like Watermelon/I Do Not like Watermelon. As the children go to the next activity, have them sign their name to the graph. Later you can look at it as a group and see which was more, like/do not like.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways. AND Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name.

Mary Had a Little Lamb, by Sarah Josepha Hale

                  This nursery rhyme is put to beautiful pictures of a real Mary and a real lamb.  The children will enjoy reading the book with you.

Materials

  • Piece of fleece and any other fur or skin you might have.
  •  Several small brushes or combs.
  •  Any stuffed animals that you may have, especially those with longer fur.
  •  Cotton balls or pom-poms
  •  Tweezers or tongs
  • A variety of materials with different textures to collage

Vocabulary

  •    Fleece (lamb fur)
  •    Linger (to hang around waiting)
  •    Appear (showed up)

Before Reading the Story

                  Show the children the cover of the book.  Ask the children what Mary (the girl) has on her face.  Talk about glasses for a moment.  Do any of your children wear glasses, what do glasses do?  How do you take care of them? After the children have talked about glasses, point to the girl and say this is Mary.  Pause for a second and see if any child can make the connection between the cover illustration and the title of the story.  If not, read the title and ask the children if anyone has ever heard of this story?

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Reading the Story;

                  Read it through once and then sing it through encouraging the children to join in.

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plays, games, and performances.

After Reading the Story

                  Ask the children the following questions; What kind of pet did Mary have?  Do any of you have a pet?  Where did the lamb follow Mary to?  What did the lamb do at school? 

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Invite a child or staff member to bring a pet to school to visit.

Science/Science Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Discovery

                  Bring in fleece for the children to feel.  Also bring in any other fur or skins that you might have.  Talk about the textures.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships.

Music and Movement

                  Sing Mary Had a Little Lamb. Act it out allowing children to take turns being Mary and the lamb.

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plays, games, and performances.

Blocks

                  Encourage the children to build a school.  Add your farm animals. As the children build you can sing, “Dee she had a little cow, little cow, little cow. DSee she had a little cow it’s fur was spotted black. Make up verses to suit the farm animals that the children are using.

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plays, games, and performances. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor SKills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Art

                  Put out a variety of textures to let the children collage with today.  As they glue them to their paper, talk about the different names of textures (soft, fluffy, smooth, rough, bumpy, slick)

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops increasing ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences and comparisons among objects and materials.

Sand and water

Child choice

Library and Writing

                  Ask the children to draw a picture of a favorite animal. Ask the child to describe what they think it’s skin feels like. Under the picture write (Kerry) had a little (cat) it’s (fur was soft and furry).  (Elephant=skin was wrinkly and grey).

Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and in play.

Dramatic Play

                  Add any stuffed animals that you have and several brushes or combs for the children to brush the animals fur.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; shows growing independence in hygiene, nutrition, and personal care when eating, wasing, brushing, and toileting.

Math and Manipulatives

                  Put out a bowl of cotton balls/pom-poms and a pair of tweezers or tongs.  Show the children how to pick up a cotton ball using the tweezers and put it into a second bowl. If using pompoms, put out several bowls so the children can sort by color.

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; shows growth in matching, sorting, putting in a series, and regrouping objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size.

Outdoor Play

                  Do animal walks with the children.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Transitions

                  In the story the children thought it was funny to see a lamb at school.  Take turns asking the children if they can think of something that they think would be funny to see or do at school.  Enjoy a good laugh with the children.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Friends, by Helme Heine

            Three good friends share their adventures and their philosophy on what it means to be a friend.

Materials

  • Picture of each child in the class, full body
  • Pictures of children at play
  • Pig, rooster, mouse mask
  • Hi-ho cherry-o game boards

Vocabulary

  •  Conquered (to take control of something)
  •  Fair (always thinking about another person and to share equally)

Before Reading the Story

            Explain to the children that you are going to play a game called thumbs up.  You are going to say a short story and if it sounds like the good way to treat a friend, give a thumb up sign.  If not, give a thumb down sign.  Make your scenario/stories ones that you have seen happen within your classroom (one day Kerry and Roger were playing in the blocks and Kerry kicked Roger’s tower by accident.  Kerry said she was sorry and Roger said it was ok..  One day Kerry and Roger were playing in the blocks and Kerry wanted the block Roger had but Roger said “no” so  Kerry knocked down his block tower because she was mad).  Give examples using puppets and let the children decide if it was a thumb up or a thumb down.   Do friend and not friend actions, how does it make you feel? What could you have done instead?

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Control; develops an understanding of how their actions affect others adm begins to accept the consequences of their actions. AND Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; progresses in responding sympathetically to peers who are in need, upset, hurt, or angry; and in expressing empathy and caring for others.

Reading the Story

Looking at the cover, can the children predict what it might be about? Introduce the story.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

After Reading the Story

            Talk about what the three friends liked to do together, recall the order of events.  What things did they share along the way?  Ask the children what kinds of things they like to do with their friends.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates growing abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story. AND Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; shows progress in developing friendships with peers.

Discovery

            Bring in pictures of children interacting together. Ask the children to describe what they see happening.  Do you think these children are friends, why?  Do they look like they are having fun, being safe, etc?  Talk about the actions in the pictures.  Have the children use their observation skills to notice faces and body language.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Control; develops an understanding of how their actions affect others adm begins to accept the consequences of their actions.

Music and Movement

            Have the children lay on their backs and put their feet up in the air.  Pretend to pedal a bicycle.  Can you peddle fast, slow, around a sharp corner? 

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; participates actively in games, outdoor play, and other forms of exercise that enhance physical fitness.

            Sing Row, Row, Row the Boat with the children.  The children can partner up with another and try to row together, side-side, holding hands back and forth, back to back, etc.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing ability to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games and using materials; and to interact without being overly directive or submissive.

Blocks

            Contact pictures of the children in the class to the small rectangle blocks.  The children can then build a structure for their friends and act out play scenarios.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increasing flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Art

            Print out large letters of the alphabet from the computer.  Give the children a variety of art materials to decorate the letters (collage, paint, drawing supplies).  When the letters are dry you can cut them out and mount them onto your wall.  As the children decorate the letters, ask if they know the letter name, the letter sound, and words that might begin with that letter.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge;Identifies at least 10 letters of the alphabet, especially those in their name.

Sand and Water

            Put boats into the water table and small animals.  If you have no boats, plastic containers and lids will work.  Can you put three friends in and float?  How many friends can you get into your boat? 

Mathematics/Number & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means to solving problems and determining quantity. AND Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Library and Writing

            Take a big piece of paper and write F is for Friends across the top.  Have the children think of words that begin with F.  Write these words on the paper down the left side.  After the children have thought of F words, they can all practice making their own F’s on the paper, or they may like to illustrate some of the F words. (Foot, flower, funny, freckle, finger, fingernail, flap, four, fish)

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing progress of beginning and ending sounds in words.

Dramatic play

            Use the animal heads to make masks.  Color and decorate.  Staple to a sentence strip and adjust to the child’s head size.  They can become the characters while they share and play in dramatics.

Creative Arts/ Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Math and Manipulatives

            Home made Hi-ho Cherri-o game.  Make several copies of the cherry tree and cut out many small red circles.  Put the circles onto the trees.  The children use a dice to roll.  The number they roll is the number of cherries they can remove from their tree.  The object is to remove all the cherries from the tree.  Play until everyone’s tree is empty.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Outdoor play

            Give each other rides on the back of the tricycles. 

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; progresses in physical growth, strength, stamina, and flexibility.

Put a sheet on the ground and pretend that it is a boat.  Gather as many children as want to play and go for a sail.  Pretend to catch fish and swim from the side of the boat.

Creative Arts/ Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations. AND Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing ability to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games and using materials; and to interact without being overly directive or submissive.

Transitions

            Ask the children to describe one thing they like to do with a friend. Write their responses on a piece of paper and hang on the wall.

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; shows progress in developing friendships with peers.