Sip,Slurp,Soup,Soup,Caldo, Caldo,Caldo by Diane Gonzales Bertrand

            Mother is busy in the kitchen making soup and the family is waiting.  This book goes through the steps to prepare the soup and readers will get caught up in the family’s anticipation for Mother’s delicious caldo.

Materials

  •  Corn tortillas
  •  Alphabet stickers
  •  Soup bowl alphabet seek and find
  •  Large pot and ladle
  • Dice
  • Plastic spoon per child
  • Several cardboard circle as a tortilla pattern
  • Several plastic knives for playdough cutting
  • Chalk for outside

Vocabulary

  •             Caldo (a special broth used to make soup) A kind of vegetable soup

Before Reading the Story

            Bring a variety of plastic foods or food picture cards to the rug.  Tell the children that you are going to pretend to make vegetable soup today.  Hold up the foods and ask the children to name it. Is this a vegetable?  If it is, put it into the pot.  If it is not, put it to the side.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Reading the Story

Encourage the children to repeat lines in the story of “caldo, caldo, caldo” and “tortilla, tortilla, tortilla”.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest in reading-related activities, such as asking to have a favorite book read; choosing to look at books; drawing pictures based on stories; asking to take books home; going to the library; and engaging in pretend-reading with other children.

After reading the Story

            Tell the children that you are going to pretend that you are making alphabet soup.  Draw a large bowl onto a piece of paper.  Ask the children to show you what three looks like on their fingers (hold up 3 fingers) and then put an alphabet letter on each/each child will receive three stickers.  After all the children have 3 stickers, point to an alphabet chart and say “if you have the letter R that looks like this you can come put it in the soup bowl”.  As the children put their letters on the paper bowl, encourage them to make the letter sounds with you. Continue choosing letters until all the children have put their letters into the soup.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; shows progress in associating the names of letters with their shapes and sounds.

Discovery

            Bring in corn tortillas for the children to roll up and try.  Are you eating anything for lunch that they can try to use their tortilla as a straw? Make a chart; Like-Dislike Tortillas. Have the children mark their preference.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences. AND Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means, including discussion, drawings, maps, and charts.

Music and Movement

Do the Jack Hartmann song Special Soup https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXqEty5dA1Y

Sing The Soup is Boiling Up to the tune of The Farmer in the Dell. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnVxTT42Kik

The soup is boiling up,

The soup is boiling up,

Stir it slow around we go,

The soup is boiling up.

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing awareness of beginning and ending sounds in words.

Blocks

Bring out any alphabet blocks that you have today. If you do not have alphabet blocks, you can put stickers onto your regular blocks. Encourage the children to write their names, copy simple words such as soup and caldo amd to name any letters that they can identify.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; identifies at least 10 letters of the alphabet, especially those in their own name.

Art

            Use play dough and rollers to roll the play dough out very thin. Use the cardboard circles and plastic knives to cut out tortillas.  Or show the children how to make a ball of play dough and work it out into a tortilla.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Sand and Water

            Put any plastic vegetables you might have in the water table so the children can wash them and pretend to be making soup. Include the soup pot and ladle. Can the children name the vegetables as they ladle them into the pot?

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Library and Writing

            Bring the soup bowl picture from group to the table.  Give each child another sticker or just show/name a letter.  Ask the child to then use a colored pencil to circle the one/s just like this.  (Kerry you find the T that looks like this and Roger you find the R just like in your name).  Or you can use the soup bowl to find and circle all the letters in the child’s name.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; shows progress in associating the names of letters with their shapes and sounds. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing, and art tolls, including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes, and various types of technology.

Dramatic play

            Tell the children that the vegetables are being washed in the water table so let’s make something else today.  Ask the children to tell you about some of their favorite foods that their mother might cook.  Encourage them to pretend to prepare them for you.  Add paper so if they need to make a grocery list.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Math and Manipulatives

            Give each child a plastic bowl.  Put out a pile of counters, any kind will work.  Tell the children that you are going to make ______soup (my counters were bears so we made bear soup).  Take turns rolling the dice and putting the correct number of bears/counters into the bowls using a plastic spoon.  Pretend to eat the bear soup as the children take the bears in and out of the bowl while they count.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Outdoor Play

On the cement use the chalk to make an alphabet line. Make each letter about six inches tall and spaced out so that the children can jump from letter to letter. Some letters can be closer together and others further apart. Show the children how to start on letter A and jump and sing the alphabet to Z.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; knopws the letters of the alphabet are a special category of visual graphics that can be individually named. AND Physical Health and Development/Gross Motor Skills;shows increasing levels of proficiency, control, nad balance in walking, climbing, running, jumping, hopping, skipping, marching, and galloping.

Transitions

Let the children take turns picking a hot/cold card and taping it onto the correct side of a large paper titled Hot / Cold.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; develops growing awareness of ideas and language related to attributes of time and temperature.

Resources

Can you find the letters in your name in the bowl of soup?

New Shoes for Silvia, by Johanna Hurwitz

            Silvia receives a pair of shoes in the mail but they are too big.  She must wait for the shoes to fit her feet.  Until then, she thinks of many ways to use her shoes.

Materials

  • Shoe design for shoe match game
  • A variety of boxes from small to shoe bow size
  • Picture of a large shoe for each child
  • Several towels to dry feet

Vocabulary

  • Pair (two similar things that are used together)
  • Sole (bottom of the shoe)
  •  Tia (the Spanish word for Aunt)
  •  Oxen ( a kind of cow that is used to pull a wagon)

Before Reading the Story

            Bring in a box with a pair of shoes inside.  Keep the box closed and have the children try to guess what is inside the box.  (There’s a pair of something in here.  They have tongues and 6 eye holes each.  They are made out of rubber and have a sole.  They come in many colors but these are white with stripes).

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences.

Reading the Story

            Take your time on each page and talk about how life in Silvia’s home looks different then life in the US.

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; progresses in understanding similarities and respecting differences among people, genders, race, special needs, culture, language, and family structures.

After Reading the Story

            Recall with the children all the things Silvia did with her shoes while she was waiting for her feet to grow.  Ask the children if they can think of any other things they could do with the shoes if they were waiting.  Ask the children if they remember what color Silvia’s shoes were. 

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Make a simple graph that shows the colors of the shoes that the children are wearing today.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Discovery

            Explain to the children that many shoes have a design on the sole of the shoe.  Have the children put a thin piece of paper over the bottom of the shoe and use the side of a crayon to do a shoe rubbing.  When they are finished, hang the rubbings on the wall.  Can the children tell which shoe belongs to them?  Do they see any letters or shapes? 

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; grows in recognizing and solving problems through active exploration, including trial and error, and interactions and discussions with peers and adults. AND Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; knows that letters of the alphabet are a special category of visual graphics that can be individually named.

Music and Movement

            Have each child take off one of their shoes and place them in a pile in the middle of the circle.  The teacher takes one shoe and begins to sing, we will pass this shoe from me to you to you.  We will pass the shoe and that’s just what we’ll do.  The shoe gets passed around the circle until it arrives at the child to whom it belongs.  The child then puts it behind his back and another shoe gets passed.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

            Teach the children the poem, One, Two, Buckle My Shoe. Have the children hold up the correct amount of fingers as you do the poem.

1,2 buckle my shoe

3,4 shut the door

5,6 pickup sticks

7,8 lay them straight

9,10 begin again

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count in sequence to 10 and beyond.

Blocks

If you are able to collect a variety of boxes, add them to the block center today for extra building materials. (Think cereal, shoe, jewelry, and food boxes. If you choose to make these permanent parts of your block center, stuff them with newspaper and tape them securely shut).

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Art

            Give each child a shoe shape and have them decorate it any way they choose.  Offer glitter, water colors, stickers, and fun collage materials to decorate their shoe.

Creative Arts/Art; develops growing abilities to plan, work indepently, and demonstrate care and [persistence in a variety of art projects.

Library and Writing

            On a half a sheet of paper write a large number 1.  Continue on halves of paper writing the numbers 1-10.  Give the children shoe laces or pieces of yarn and show them how to lay the shoe lace over the numbers.  You can also let the children use play dough to cover the numbers.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Sand and Water

If possible, put your water table on the floor and let the children take turns splashing around in shallow water. After they have had their turn, encourage them to put their shoes on by themselves.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Control; demonstrates increasing capacity to follow rules and routines and use materials purposefully, safely, and respectfully. AND Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; shows growing independence in hygiene, nutrition, and personal care when eating, dressing, washing hands, brushing teeth, and toileting.

Dramatic Play

            Encourage shoe play today.  Bring in a variety of shoes in various sizes.  Add a ruler or shoe-measuring device so the children can see how big their foot is.  Make sure to have at least on pair that requires lacing so the children can practice.  Ask the children to put the shoes in order from smallest to largest.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows progress in using standard and non-standard measures for length and area of objects. AND Shows increasing abilities to match, sort, put in a series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size.

Math and Manipulatives

            Make several sets of the shoes page that the children can use to match. If you make several sets then they will match not only the shoe shape but the colors.

Mathematics/Geometry Spatial Sense; shows growth in matchng, sorting, putting in a series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size. 

Outdoor Play

            As the children run and play, remind them that their shoes are helping to protect their feet from sharp objects.  Also keep a close eye for shoes that are untied or unbuckled/unvelcro.  Explain that it is important so that they will not trip and fall.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities.

Transitions

            Silvia’s shoes were red.  As the children go to the next activity can they name red things?  When you have exhausted one color, go to another.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Resources

Mama, Do You Love Me? by Barbara M. Joosse

            A little girl asks her Mama if she loves her.  Her Mother’s response is  always a yes.  This book has bold pictures that show the life of the Inuit’s in the northern regions of the artic.  And it conveys the message of unconditional love between a mother and her child.

Materials

  • Several trays of ice cubes
  • Globe
  • Books and/or pictures of Arctic life
  • Any winter clothing that you can add to dramatic play

Vocabulary

  • Spout (the water that comes from the whales head like a fountain)
  • Umiak (a kind of boat that the Inuit use)
  • Mukluks (a big pair of boots made to wear over shoes or with extra socks)

Before Reading the Story

            Ask the children if their parent has ever gotten mad at them?  Ask if they have ever gotten mad at their parent?  Ask them to show you what mad looks like.  Tell them that sometimes everyone gets mad.  What should you do if you are mad?  Ask the children if they know what it means to forgive.  What are some things that people do to forgive each other? (say sorry, hug, smile at each other, shrug shoulders and go play).

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

            Tell the children that the story today takes place in the artic.  Show them on the globe.  Tell them that the arctic is always very cold.

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; begins to express and understand concepts and language of geography in the contexts of the classroom, home, and community.

Reading the Story

            As you read, stop on each page that names an emotion and ask the children to show you what that emotion looks like.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

After Reading the Story

            Do the people in the story dress like you do where you live?  Could you tell what the weather was like when we read the story?    What was the little girl’s biggest worry? (Mama do you love me?) 

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction and non-fiction and poetry.

Discovery

            Bring in any books or pictures of life in the arctic circle (the animals, the dress of the people, modern life style, transportation, etc).

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction and non-fiction and poetry.

Music and Movement

            Go on a pretend bear hunt with the children. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BP2GwOLr2nI

            Sing If You’re Happy and You Know It, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kk0mASRGEI8 then sing about if you’re sorry, if you’re angry, very angry, worried, surprised.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Blocks

            Tell the children that an umiak is a kind of boat.  Can the children build a boat out of blocks?  If you do not have the right kind of blocks to build a boat for the children, encourage them to try to make one for a doll or stuffed animals.  Make sure you add sides so the water does not splash inside.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions, to take turns in games and in using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive. AND Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop and follow through on plans.

Art

            Show the children the masks on the front and back inside covers.  Put out paper plates with a variety if collage materials to make masks.  Cut two eye holes out before they begin.

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities ti create drawings, paintings, models. and other art creations that are more detailed, creative, or realistic.

Sand and Water

            Put water in the table and add several trays of ice.  It is cold in the arctic where the story took place.  Add any arctic animals you might have.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities.

Library and Writing

            Tell the children that you heard the letter M many times in the story.  It was in the words, Mama, musk-ox, mukluks, and moose.  Ask the children to make the /M/ letter sound.  Can they think of any more /M/ words?  Can they find anything in the room that begins with the letter M?  Dump the magnet letters out onto the table and see if the children can find the M’s.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; shows progress in associating the names of letters with their shapes and sounds.

Dramatic Play

            Bring winter clothes for drama.  Include some boots/mukluks, jacket, mittens, hats, and scarves.

Creative Arts/Dramatic PLay; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Math and Manipulatives

            Show the children The mother and the daughter’s dresses were full of beautiful patterns.  Show the children how to use one of your manipulatives to make patterns (chain links, parquetry shapes, 1”cubes).

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials.

Outdoor Play

            If you read this book in the winter, go out and play in the snow! 

Science/Scientific Knowledge; develops a growing awareness of ideas and language related to attributes of time and temperature.

            Play Ferocious Bear!  Have the children practice growling.  Play Ferocious Bear like tag.  The children can growl as they run around the playground. 

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; participates actively in games, outdoor play, and other forms of exercise that enhance physical fitness.

Transitions

            Ask the children, how much do you love your Mama?  (more than the sun, as much as cookies, forever) . Write their answers on a piece of paper and hang it on the wall.

Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and in play.

Resources