Guess how Much I Love You, by Sam McBratney

            Little Hare shares with Big Hare how much he loves him and Big hare loves him right back more.

Materials

  •             Picture of little nut hare for measuring
  •             Folded heart cutting paper
  •             Picture of I love you in sign language

Vocabulary

  •             Wide (a big distance between two sides or edges)
  •             High (a big distance from top to bottom)
  •             Far (a big distance away)
  •             Hare (another name for a rabbit)

Before Reading the Story

            Talk to the children about who they love, who loves them, and how they show their love for another person.  (When my brother falls down I help him to stand up, My Daddy hugs me and calls me a big boy, I can show you how to say I love you with my fingers).

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Reading the Story

Stretch out your arms and reach as high as you can while beginning the story.

After Reading the Story

            With the children review the different ways that Nutbrown Hare said he loved Big Nutbrown Hare.  Ask the children if they can think of things that are very far away and very high up. Write their responses and hang it on the wall.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem. AND Literacy/Early Writing;develops understanding that writing is a way of communicating for a variety of purposes.

Teach the children to say I love you in sign language.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs; and for other varied purposes.

Discovery;

Challenge the children and yourself to look up the differences between a rabbit and a hare with a book that depicts real animals or the internet. https://lionheadrabbitcare.com/rabbit-vs-hare-differences/

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Music and Movement

            Sing the Barney Song, I Love You. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uq734_nZ7Eo

I love you, you love me

We’re a happy family

With a great big hug

And a kiss from me to you

Won’t you say you love me too.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs; and for other varied purposes.

            Sing It’s Love. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TB6hivRQxmE

It’s love, it’s love, it’s love that makes the world go round

It’s love, it’s love, it’s love that makes the world go round

It’s love, it’s love, it’s love that makes the world go round

It’s love that makes the world go round.

It’s Mom’s, it’s Dad’s, it’s children that make the world go round…

It’s boys, it’s girls, it’s friends that make the world go round….

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plays, games, and performances.

Blocks

            Ask the children to demonstrate wide by building something.  They could also demonstrate tall, longer, and higher.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

 Art

            Show the children how to cut out hearts by first folding a piece of paper in half.  Let the children cut out hearts and then glue them to a piece of paper.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Library and Writing

            Help the children to fill in the blanks…

I love you farther than________

I love you higher than_______

I love you longer than________

I love you more than________

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

            Then encourage them to make a card to take home to a loved one.

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; progresses in responding sympathetically to peers who are in need, upset, hurt, or angry; and in expressing empathy and caring for others.

Sand and Water

            Add water and many different sizes of cups.  Which cup is biggest?  Which cup can hold the most water?

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; begins to make comparisons between several objects based on a single attribute.

Dramatic Play

            Add small pieces of colorful paper and envelopes for the children to write love letters to their family and friends.  Add a ‘post’ box or an old mailbox for the children to put their letters into.  Provide a list of the class names so the children can be copy.

Literacy/Early Writing; experiments with a growing variety of writing tools and materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computers. AND Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; progresses in responding sympathetically to peers who are in need, upset, hurt, or angry; and in expressing empathy and caring for others.

Math and Manipulatives

            Cut out and contact/laminate 10 Nutbrown Hares.  Show the children how to use these to measure how tall they are, the length of the table, how far from the shelf to the table, etc..

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows progress in using standard and non-standard measures for length and area of objects.

Outdoor Play

            Play Leap Hare which is the same as Leap Frog.  You can also practice doing running broad jumps and standing broad jumps and see who can jump farthest.

Physical Health & Development/Gross Motor Skills; shows increasing levels of proficiency, control, and balance in walking, climbing, running, jumping, hopping, skipping, marching, and galloping.

Transitions

            Ask each child to think of a “Guess how much I love you”  (I love you more then there are stars.  I love you more than jelly beans, I love you bigger than a bus).

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Resources

On Mother’s Lap, by Ann Herbert Scott

            There’s no place as comforting as Mother’s lap.  In this story a little boy brings his favorite things to his Mother’s lap where there always seems to be enough room.  But what will happen when the baby wakes up, will he still have a lap to sit on?

Materials

  •             Parachute or large sheet
  •             My Family graphing directions
  •             Pictures of children on Mother’s lap

Vocabulary

  • Rocking chair ( a chair with curved pieces of wood attached to the bottom to make the chair go back and forth)
  • Reindeer (a kind of animal, like a big deer)
  • Whisper (to say something very, very softly)
  • Jealous (Unhappy because another person gets something you want)

Before Reading the Story

            Ask the children if they know what it means to be jealous?  Have they ever been jealous of another person? (I wanted the baby doll but Kerry got it but then she let me have a turn next, I wanted the red one but Roger said no). 

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Ask the children who likes to sit on their Mother’s lap? Ask them how it makes them feel (happy, special, good warm, soft).  Tell the children that children all over the world like to sit on Mother’s lap.

Language Development/Speaking & Understanding; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other vaired purposes.

Reading the Story

            As you read, rock gently back and forth.  Read in a soft soothing voice.  When you get to the page where Michael says, “There isn’t room”, stop and ask the children if they can tell how Michael is feeling (jealous), why (he thinks that Mother will put him down now)?  Ask the children what they think will happen.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

After Reading the Story

            Ask the children who remembers what jealous means?  Ask the children why they think that Michael did not want his baby sister to come and sit with his Mother and him?  (There would not be enough room for them both).  Look at the picture of Michael and the baby on Mother’s lap and ask how Michael is feeling now (happy).  Tell the children when they share something it helps jealous feelings go away.  Point out recent examples of sharing you have seen in your room. (Yesterday I saw Kerry share the bicycle with Roger, that was being a good friend, Today Roger was looking at the book Kerry wanted so he said they could look at it together, that was sharing).

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; shows increasing abilities to use compromise and discussion in working, playing, and resolving conflict with peers.

Science

            Use a balance scale.  Put one heavy object on the left side and ask the children to see how many lighter objects it takes to balance the scale out.  (large rubber animal and 1 inch cubes, rock and shells)

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows progress in using standard and non-standard measures for length and area of objects.

Music and Movement

            Play the following; If You Have

If you have a big brother, stand up.

If you have a big brother, stand up

Big brothers its true, are older then you.

(Now do big sisters)

If you have a little brother, stand up.

If you have a little brother, stand up.

Little brothers its true, are younger then you.

(Now do little sisters)

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress un understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions. AND Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops ability to identify personal characteristics, including gender and family composition.

Blocks

Put play people into the center today and encourage the children to build homes for the families.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Art

            Bring in old supply catalogs and let the children cut out all the toys they would like for the playground or classroom.  Have them glue them to a poster board that is labeled “Class Wish List”.  Note after you finish the class collage that there was room on the paper for everybody’s cuttings.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Sand and Water

Add water and toy boats to the water table today. Remind the children that the little boy in the story brought a toy boat to his mother’s lap.

Library and Writing

            Use the rocking chair picture to have the children illustrate what they would take to their Mother’s lap, write their dictation underneath.

Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and in play.

Dramatic Play;

            Ask the children what kinds of things they like to do with their Mother.  Help direct the play to act out several of these scenarios.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences. AND Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; progresses in understanding similarities and respecting differences among people such as genders, race, special needs, culture, language, and family structures.

Math and Manipulatives

            Use unifix cubes or small pieces of paper to make a family graph. Have the children illustrate all the members that they call family.  Put out the people illustrations to show what color cubes to take for each family member.  The children collect the appropriate colored cubes to represent their family.  Who has the biggest family, who has the most sisters?

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops ability to identify personal characteristics, including gender and family composition. AND Mathematics/Number & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quantities.

Outdoor Play

            Bring out a parachute or large sheet for parachute play today.  When the children come over to play, tell them there is always room for one more.  Let the children help maneuver their bodies to all fit around the parachute.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games and using materials; and to interact without being overly directive or submissive.

Transitions

            Dismiss the children in a whisper voice. 

Resources

Owl Babies, by Martin Waddell

            When the baby owls wake up in the middle of the night, their mother is gone!  The babies are scared, where could she be? 

Materials

  • A good picture of an owl that shows detail (calendar, internet, natural magazine)
  • Bag of colored feathers
  • Owl head pattern for paper bag puppet
  • Paper lunch sack, one per child
  • Cut out a large tree with several branches.  Cut out three leaves per child.
  • Grocery list or flyers
  • Snapping clothes pins, several
  • Box of large paper clips
  • Several hoola hoops or string circles

Vocabulary

  • Beak (the mouth of a bird)
  • Brave (to show courage even when you are afraid or nervous)
  • Owlet (a baby owl)
  • Talons (the hooked claws found on the owls feet)

Before Reading the Story

            Show the children the cover of the book.  Does anyone know the name of this kind of bird? Ask them if they can tell what time of day it is.  Look at the baby owl’s eyes.  How do you think they feel?  They look scared.  What do you think made them afraid?

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes. AND Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Reading the Story

            Read adding inflection so the children can hear a bit of fear in your voice.  Encourage the children to say Bill’s line with him, “I want my Mommy!” 

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest in reading related activities, such as asking to have a favorite book read;choosing to look at books; drawing pictures based on stories; asking to take books home; going to the library; and engaging in pretend reading with other children.

After Reading the Book

            Lead a discussion into ‘being afraid’.  Have you ever been afraid?  What did you do?  Do you know what it means to be brave?  Think of a time when you were brave (I got a shot and didn’t cry, My Dad took the wheels off my bicycle and told me to ride on only two, The dog came in my yard and I was outside). 

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied spoken vocabulary.

Discovery

            Find a detailed picture of an owl.  Talk with the children about the picture.  Look at the owl’s eyes, why do you think they are so big (to be able to see at night), Did you know owls cannot move their eyes, they have to turn their heads.   Look at the owls’ beak, why do you think it is so sharp? (To eat meat)  What do we use to eat meat?  Look at the owl’s feet, why do you think their nails are so sharp?  Their feet are called talons.  Continue to look at the owl and see if the children can compare owls to people and how they are alike and different. 

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes. AND Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences.

Music and Movement

            Put several hoola hoops on the floor.  Each hoop should be able to hold several children.  Have the children practice flying and swooping from one hoop to the next.  Make sure you practice woo, wooing also.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Teach the poem, Wide-Eyed Owl

Wide-Eyed Owl

Here’s a wide-eyed owl

With a pointed beak

And claws upon his toes.

He lives up high in the tree.

He turns his head to look at me.

He flaps his wings

And says whoo,whoo,whoo.

(Act out accordingly)

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Blocks

            The owl family lived in a tree in the forest.  Encourage the children to recreate the forest by standing many varied blocks up on end.  Can they stack one upon the other, can they stack three?

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Art

            Use the owl head and glue it to a paper lunch sack.  Put out many colored feathers and let the children glue them on to the bag to make an owl puppet.  For a less structured art project, just put out the feathers and let the children make a feather collage. 

Creative Arts/Art; gains ability in using different art media and materials in a variety of ways for creative expression and representation.

Sand and Water

            With sand in table, add many small animal counters or small items.  Show the children how to open the clothespins and grab an animal.  Put a small basket beside the table and the children can move the animals they “catch with their owl beak” and put them in the basket. 

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors,l paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Library and Writing

            Ask the child to take a leaf and write their name on it.  Then add a piece of tape and give the child a positional direction of where to tape it to the tree. (Put your leaf under a branch, at the top of the tree, next to Kerry’s leaf, on the left side of the tree).

Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name. AND Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; builds an increasing understanding of directionality, order, and positions of objects, and words such as up, down, over, under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front, behind.

Dramatic Play

            Put grocery lists and grocery fliers into the center and encourage the children to pretend that they are getting ready to go to the grocery store.  Will the baby dolls go with to the store or will they stay at home?  Who will they stay home with?  Ask the children if their parents have ever left home without them.  Did someone come to stay with you?  Who?  What did you do? 

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Math and Manipulatives

            Have the children count out 8 paperclips.  Tell them that these are the talons for their owl puppet.  Have them slip them onto the bottom of the paper bag and count as they put them on. 

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Outdoor Play

            Tell the children that they are going to be owl families.  Pick several children to be the owlets.  They must stay together while their parents go to gather food for them.  Have the parent owls’ swoop around the playground picking up sticks (mice and snakes) to bring back to their babies to eat.  The babies can hoot while they wait for their parents. 

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Transitions

            Give each child a colored feather.  Have them use the feather to find something else in the room that is the same color.  They can fly around the room looking for objects.   After a short amount of time they can gather back at the carpet.  As they go off to the next activity they can tell you the color name of their objects, the names of the objects themselves, and how many objects they were able to find.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops an increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem. AND Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; shows growth in matching, sorting, putting in a series, and regrouping objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size.

Dear Parent-

            Today we talked about owls.  Go for a walk with your child and look for other kinds of birds that are in your neighborhood.  Teach your child the names of one or two of these bird species and how to identify them (That’s a cardinal, he is red all over.  That’s a Robin Red Breast because his belly and breast area are the color red).

Resources