How Ducklings Grow, by Diane Molleson

            Wonderful pictures help explain all about ducks. 

Materials

  • Pie pan, baby food oil, eye dropper, and food coloring
  • Feathers for gluing
  • 26 ducks

Vocabulary

Before Reading the Story

            Tape a large piece of paper to the wall divided into three columns.  In the first write, What we know.  In the second write, What we want to know, In the third write, What we learned.  Show the children the cover of the book.  Ask the children what they know about ducks.  Write their responses in column one.  After the children have told all they know about ducks, ask them what they would like to know about ducks.  Write these responses in column two.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes. AND Literacy/Early Writing; develops understanding that writing is a way of communicating for a variety of purposes.

Reading the Book

            Take your time reading the story so that the children can have time to study the pictures. Allow discussion along the way.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

After Reading the Story

            Tell the children that the third column you made was for things that the children learned from the book about ducks.  Let them respond.  Use the pictures if they do not respond to help them begin to talk more about ducks.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Discovery

            Put the book into the center along with paper and pencil so the children can try to draw ducks. 

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities to create drawings, paintings, models, and other art creations that are more detailed, creative, and realistic.

In the book it talked about how water rolls off the ducks feather because they have oil in them.  Bring in a pie pan and fill it with a little water.  Mix some baby oil with food coloring.  Let the children use an eye dropper to drop colored oil into the water and see what happens.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships.

Music and Movement

            Teach the children a duck song like Five Little Ducks http:// https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pZw9veQ76fo

or The Little White Duck. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y57RWhz76y8

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities including listening, finger plays, singing, games, and performances.

Blocks

        Encourage the children to make a pond or lake for the ducks.  If you have a rubber duck put it into the center.

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop follow through on plans.

Art

            Cut out duck shapes from construction paper.  Let the children make a feather collage on top of the duck.

Creative Arts/Art; gains ability using different art media and materials in a variety of ways for creative expression and representation.

Sand and Water

            Fill the table with water and add rubber ducks to float.  Encourage the children to find other objects in the room that float.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.

Dramatic Play

Math and Manipulatives

            Make two sets of the 26 ducks page.  Cut them out and let the children match the like ducks. Put an alphabet letter onto each duck pair or numbers, colors that you are working on.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; identifies at least 10 letters of the alphabet, especially those in their own name.

Outdoors

Play follow the leader. The teacher can be the mother duck and the children follow along behind. Make quacking noises as you lead the children to or around the playground.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; participates actively in games, outdoor play, and other forms of exercise that enhance physical fitness.

Transitions

Tell the children to listen closely and count your quacks. Quack out loud for each child 1-10 quacks depending upon where each child is developmentally.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quantity.

Resources

Chickens Aren’t the Only Ones, by Ruth Heller

This book is a wonderful introduction to oviparous creatures.  Besides being a fun word to teach children, the pictures and simple text will help children to really see and understand that lots of creatures are egg laying and thus, oviparous indeed.

Materials

  •     Box large enough for a child to get inside.
  •     Animals that are oviparous pictures
  •     3 raw eggs 
  •     1 boiled egg per child in the classroom
  •    Plastic Easter eggs, lot
  •    4 shallow boxes and 4 small balls (golf, ping-pong, or larger marble)
  •    Jelly bean graph
  •    10 one-inch tall eggs in three colors

Vocabulary

  •    Oviparous (animals that lay eggs from which their babies hatch)

Before Reading the Story

 Ask the children if they can name an animal that is oviparous.  Define the word and help them to pronounce it.  Ask again if they can name an animal that is oviparous.  After they have named any, or not, tell them you are going to play a game using oviparous animals.  Hold up the pictures of the animals from the copy page one at a time. Let the children name them and then lay them down where all the children can see them.  After naming the animals play, Which Oviparous Animal is the Egg Hiding Under?  A child hides their eyes and then a second child puts the egg shape under an animal.  When the egg is hidden the class choruses, “Which oviparous animal is the egg under?”  The first child opens their eyes and must guess.  Continue to play until everyone has had an opportunity to hide the egg and guess. 

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions, to take turns in games and using materials, and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.  AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied spoken language.

Reading the Story

Introduce the story by saying, “We know that lots of animals lay eggs.  Our story today is called, Chickens Aren’t the Only Ones”.   Make sure to point out the eggs and their shapes while reading the story.  

Science/Scientific Knowledge;expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, amd discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

After Reading the Story

Bring in a box large enough that a child can fit inside of it.  Make sure it still has all its flaps on it.  Introduce the poem Oviparous Animals.  While reciting the poem,one child gets in the box and pops out declaring what kind of an animal that they are.  Congratulate them when they think of specific animals not in the book (shark, brontosaurus, rattle snake,etc).   

Oviparous Animals     

 Oviparous animals out of the egg crack                                                                                                 Out comes a _________and that is that!                                  

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Discovery

 Show the children how to tell if an egg is hard boiled or raw.  Lay the egg on its side and spin it.  If it wobbles, it is raw.  If it spins freely it is hard boiled.  Let the children spin several times and then give them a hard boiled egg to peel and eat. Or make egg salad if you like.

Science/Scientific Methods & Skills; begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions, and form generalizations.  AND Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks, activities, projects, and experiences.

Music and Movement

Oviparous Animals

Oviparous animals out of the egg crack.

Out comes a _______and that is that!

Child hides in the box and then pops out declaring what kind of an oviparous animals they choose to be.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

 Make egg shakers to use to sing songs and keep rhythm with.  Use plastic Easter eggs and fill with rice.  Tape them closed.

Creative Arts/ Music; experiments with a variety of musical instruments.

Blocks

Can you build letters with your blocks?  Tell the children, “E is for egg”.   Model making an E out of blocks, children copy.  Can you make a T, V, F, H,etc?  If the teacher is modeling for the children, sit facing them and build your block letters upside down so they can see how you put the blocks together.

Literacy/Early Writing;experiments with a growing variety of writing tools and materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computers.  AND Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; shows progress in associating the names of letters with their shapes and sounds.

Art

Cut out egg shapes that fit as large as possible inside the shallow box.  Dip a small ball in paint and put it on top of the egg shape.  Let the children roll the ball back and forth, side to side to make a design on their egg.

Creative Arts/Art; gains ability in using different art media and materials in a variety of ways for creative expression and representation.

Sand and Water

Put mud into the table.  Let the children make mud balls (eggs).  Add baskets and grass clippings so the children can put the eggs into nests.  Ask them what type of oviparous animal eggs they have made.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.  AND Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Library and Writing

Ahead of time, put the pictures you found of oviparous animals under an egg shape that covers them completely.  Cut several small holes in the egg so that children can see a small peak of the creature below.  On the egg write clues of what is underneath.  Read the clues to the children and see if they can guess.  Let the children lift the egg and see if they are correct.  As they name the animal ask “What kinds of animals lay eggs?”  Have the child say oviparous animals!

I am long. I have no legs, I say hiss.

I live in a nest, I have feathers, I eat worms

I am huge, I am extinct, I am a plant eater

I am fat, people eat me, I say gobble, gobble

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences.  AND Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Dramatic Play

 Add plastic Easter eggs and sanitized egg containers.  Observe how the children use the eggs in their play today and any vocabulary that accompanies it.  Note any oviparous play.  (I have had children decide that the eggs were dinosaur eggs, that the children were crocodiles and lived under the table, and others who just cooked or ignored the eggs all together).

Creative Arts/Dramatic PLay; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Math and Manipulatives

 Jelly beans look like eggs.  Have a fun math and eating project.  Give each child a cup full of jelly beans, about 15-20 each. Have the children sort their eggs by color.  Use crayons to mark the graph of how many they have in each color.  Count the color that has the most and eat them.  Count the color that has the least and eat them. Now how many jelly beans do you have left?  Which color left is your favorite?  Count them and eat them.  Play until all the jelly beans are gone.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Outdoor Play 

 Tell the children that the book said that insects are oviparous.  Go outside and look for insects.  Take your insect catchers with you (purchased or small plastic jars).  After you catch an insect, invite the children to come and examine it.  Can they count how many legs it has?  Do you see the antenna?  If they have caught more than one insect, can they describe the differences and similarities between the two?Make sure you let them go before you come inside. 

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences, and comparisons among objects and materials.

Transitions

Cut out about 10 one-inch tall eggs in two to three colors.  Use these eggs to make patterns (ABABAB or ABCABCABC)  Put the pattern up where the children can see it and then ask the children if they can see what color comes next in the pattern?

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials.

Resources

Duckling at Home on the Pond, by Judith Love

This story tells about a duckling named Dabble and what his first day out of the egg is like. It gives some duck facts in a simple and well-illustrated manner.

Materials

  • Rubber ducks
  • Smooth and rough textured items from room and home        (sandpaper, rock, bark, piece of foil, the lens of an old pair of sunglasses, a plastic protector, a block, a color paddle, a marker, a lego, etc).
  • 1 white paper plate per child.
  • Flannel board parts for Little White Duck
  • Plastic eggs, 6 for blocks and some for the water table.

Vocabulary

  • Reeds (grassy plants that grow beside a pond)
  • Cattail stems (another plant that grows beside a pond)
  •  Gleefully (happily)
  • Dazzled (very impressed)
  •  Smooth (flat)

Before Reading the Story

 If ducks are something that lives in your area and the children might be familiar with, ask them to share their knowledge about ducks. (Where do they live, what do they eat, what sound do they make, can they swim, walk, fly?). 

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Reading the Story

On the page where Mother duck swims quickly between the snapping turtle and the duckling, ask why do you think that the Mother duck calls her babies to swim ashore?

Literacy /Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in a bilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

After Reading the Story

Look at the list you made of things you know about ducks, can the children add any new facts? (Turtles eat ducklings, baby ducks are called ducklings, Mother Duck makes a soft nest from grass, and she plucks feathers from her breast to make the nest.)

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.  AND Literacy /Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in a bilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Discovery

The story talks about how the eggs were smooth. Talk to the children about things in the room that are smooth.  Put out a box of items that have a variety of textures and let the children sort them by smooth and rough.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences and comparisons among objects and materials.  AND Mathematics/Patterns Skills & Methods; shows increasing abilities to match, sort, put in a series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size.

Music and Movement

In the story Dabble liked to tip his head down into the water and catch little fish.  Have the children get down on their haunches and pretend to swim by using their hands as feet.  Now encourage them to try to tip their heads down and catch a fish (they will have to use their hands to support them-this should look like the beginnings of a head stand).

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; progresses in physical growth, strength, stamina, and flexibility.

Make the flannel board parts for Little White Duck and present it to the children. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y57RWhz76y8

There’s a little white duck, sitting in the water

(Put pond, duck and lily pad onto your board)

A little white duck, doing what he oughter.

He took a bite of the lily pad,

He flapped his wings and he said I’m glad

I’m a little white duck sitting in the water, quack, quack, quack.

There’s a little green frog, swimming in the water

(put frog on to lily pad)

A little green frog, doing what he oughter.

He jumped right on that lily pad

That the little duck bit and he said I’m glad

I’m a little green frog swimming in the water, glug, glug. glug.

There’s a little black bug, floating in the water

(put bug on top of the water)

A little black bug doing what he oughter.

He tickled the frog on the lily pad,

That the little duck bit and he said I’m glad

I’m a little black bug floating in the water, chirp, chirp, chirp

There’s a little red snake, lying in the water

(put snake in the water)

A little red snake, doing what he oughter.

He frightened the duck and the frog so bad,

He ate the black bug and he said I’m glad

I’m a little red snake lying in the water, ssss, ssss, ssss.

(remove all the animals)

Now there’s nobody left sitting in the water

Nobody left doing what he oughter.

There’s nothing left but the lily pad

The duck and the frog ran away, I’m sad.

There’s nobody left sitting in the water

Boo, hoo, hoo.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attends to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Blocks

Add several plastic eggs to the center and ask the children if they can build a block nest to keep them safe and from rolling away.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Art

Make paper plate ducks. Draw a line across the white paper plate and have the children cut the plate in half along the line.  Help them to staple the two halves together at a right angle.  This is the duck body.  They can collage feathers, triangle shapes, use crayons, or paint their duck bodies. Add a small bill and webbed feet when the duck is dry.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multi-step directions.  AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills;develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Library and Writing

 Add flannel board parts for Little White Duck.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest in reading-related activities such as asking to have a favorite book read; choosing to look at books; drawing pictures based on stories; asking to take books home; going to the library; and engaging in pretend-reading with other children.

Sand and Water

            Add rubber ducks and plastic eggs to the water table if you have them.  If not just enjoy water play today.

Dramatic Play

 Remind the children that in the story the Mother duck took very good care of her babies.  Encourage the children to take good care of their babies also.  They can snuggle them, make them a comfortable bed, swaddle them, feed them, and dress them.

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; progresses in understanding similarities and respecting differences among people such as genders, race, special needs, culture, language, and family structures.

Math and Manipulatives

Cut out multiple copies of the insects and use them to show the children how to make simple patterns (ABAB, ABCABC).

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials.

Outdoor Play

Play Turtle tag.  Pretend to be little ducklings swimming around the playground.  The person who is “it” is the snapping turtle who tries to catch a baby duckling for its meal.  Take turns being the turtle and encourage the children to swim little duckling swim!

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & practices; participates actively in games, outdoor play, and other forms of exercise that enhance physical fitness.

Transitions

Hold up 1-5 fingers.  The child must quack the correct number of times as they go off to the next activity.  Older children try 1-10 fingers.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a  means for solving problems and determining quantities.

Resources