Stone Soup, by Jon J Muth

When hungry strangers come to town, everyone shares a small amount of their food to make a delicious soup which the whole town can enjoy.

Materials

  • Oil pastels
  • Rock collection
  • Make ahead BINGO cards
  • Crockpot and ingredients found in Resources.
  • 3-4 pots to use throughout the room today
  • Several plastic bowls and two soup ladles
  • Looking Down & Up cards

Vocabulary

  • Monk (like a minister or religious person)
  • Famine (where there is not enough food and everyone is hungry)
  • Suspicious (not trusting)
  • Scholar (someone who does research and is very smart)

Before Reading the Story

Ask the children how many of them like soup? What kinds of soups do you like to eat? Hold up the cover of the book and read the title. Ask the children if they can guess what they are looking into? What do you think they will do with the pot? Introduce the story.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story. AND Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Reading the Story

On the page where the monks first enter the village, ask the children why they think everyone closed their windows?  (The villagers did not trust anyone)

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare and contrast objects, events, and experiences. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; progresses in abilities to initiate and respond appropriately in conversation and discussions with peers and adults.

After Reading the Story

Remind the children that the villagers each shared some of their food to make the delicious soup for everyone. Spend a moment talking about sharing.  Point out any acts of sharing that you have recently seen in your classroom (Jamie shared a red marker with Sue when hers stopped working.  Thank you Jamie for sharing). Ask the children to think of a time when they shared with another person. How did it make you feel? How did it make the other person feel? What kinds of things are more fun to do when you share them with another person?

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; progresses in abilities to initiate and respond appropriately in conversation and discussions with peers and adults. AND Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; increases abilities to sustain interactions with peers by helping, sharing, and discussion.

At the end of the story, the villagers said that sharing makes everyone feel richer and happy.  As you see children sharing throughout the day, thank them for their generous spirit and thoughtfulness.

Discovery

Put out a rock collection for the children to compare and sort. Add magnifying glasses.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows increasing abilities to match, sort, put in a series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as shape or size.

Nutrition bingo. Ahead of time use the BINGO card and the veggie pictures to make BINGO cards. Remember to make each on different. Make a master card of all the veggies that you have glued to the BINGO cards to use for the draw pile.

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Curiosity; grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks, activities, projects, and experiences.

Bring in a crock pot and the ingredients needed to make your own classroom stone soup.

Music and Movement

Bring your plastic veggies to the carpet and sing, The Soup is Boiling Up. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hx6ZdPysVeA

Tell the children that you know how to make chocolate soup and sing. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRFTzna6bGE

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities including; listening, singing, finger plays, games, and performances.

Tell the children that you are going to pretend to buy items to put into your soup. Have the children name items that go into the soup (real or funny) and count! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pt0jjke_Jns

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

Open the page that shows after the banquet with the musicians playing instruments.  Tell the children that you would like to bring out your instruments, play and sing songs at the children’s requests.

Creative Arts/Music; experiments with a variety of musical instruments.

Blocks

Remind the children that the monks came to a village (community, town).  Challenge the children to build a village using the blocks today.  If you have people figures, you can add these to the center to enhance the village.  Add paper and pencil in case someone would like to add any signs to the buildings.

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; begins to express and understand concepts and language of geography in the contexts of the classroom, home, and community.

Art

Give the children a piece of white construction paper with one of the foods from the story printed or drawn on it (use black permanent marker).  Let the children color the food item using the oil pastels.  When they are finished, show them how to use watery watercolors to paint over their food.  The watercolors will not stick where the oil pastel is making the oil pastels pop.  You might want to practice once before you help the children so that you can get the right watery watercolor.

Creative Arts/Art; gains ability in using different art media and materials in a variety of ways for creative expression and representation.

Sand and Water

Fill the pot with water and put into in the sensory table today along with the plastic bowls and ladils. Show the children how to ladil the soup carefully into the bowls without spilling.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer.

Library and Writing

Alphabet soup.  Put a pot in the center with magnet letters.  The children can take turns pulling out a letter and naming.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; identifies at least 10 letters of the alphabet, especially those in their own name.

Dramatic Play

Add stones and a big pot for making stone soup.  Act out story.  Ask different children to add a food from your play food.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Math and Manipulatives

Remind the children that the cover of the book had everyone looking down into the pot. Explain that you have a sorting game where the children must sort if they are looking down or up. Use the cards in Resources.

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; builds an increasing understanding of directionality, order, and positions of objects, and words such as up, down, over, under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front, and behind.

Outdoor Play

If you have a parachute, bring it out with several balls. Have the children stand around the edges of the parachute and toss the balls into the center. The children must try not to let the balls roll out of the parachute ans it moves up and down.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; participates actively in games, outdoor play, and other forms of exercise that enhance physical fitness.

Transitions

Remind the children that In the story, the youngest monk asked, “what makes you happy”?  Ask the children this same question and write their responses onto a piece of paper to hang on the wall.  “Things that make us happy”.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Resources

About Kerry CI am an Early Childhood Educator who has seen daily the value of shared book readings with my preschoolers. I use the book theme in my centers and can daily touch upon a variety of Early Childhood Domains which makes assessing the children easy and individualized.