Miss Spider’s Tea Party, the counting book, by David Kirk

            Miss Spider is lonely.  She can not understand why none of the insects want to come to her tea party?  Count the insects as they meet Miss Spider.

Materials

  • Pitcher and about 4-6 decaffeinated fruit tea bags.
  • Crepe paper
  • A spider hung from a string ( this can be stuffed, rubber, or paper)
  • Camera

Vocabulary

  • To dash off (to run off quickly)
  • Tea party ( a party where you drink tea and eat sweets)

Before Reading the Story

            Hang a large piece of paper where all the children can see it.  Ask the children to see if they can guess what you are drawing.  Draw a simple spider on the paper.  When the children have guessed spider, have them count the eight legs with you.  Tell the children that it has to have 8 legs to be a spider. Now draw another spider but only put on 5 legs.  Ask the children if this is a spider?  (No because it only has 5 legs)  Add 3 more.  Do this several times making another spider with 8 legs and two more with more or less legs.  How many legs does a spider have to have?  Tell the children that our story today is about a spider.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Reading the Story

            Make sure to take time to let the children help count the insects on each page.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

On the children the page where Miss Spider is wiping her tears (Miss Spider sobbed, “They’ve all dashed off”).  Ask them why they think all the insects dashed off? (Because spiders eat insects). 

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; progresses in responding sympathetically to peers who are in need, upset, hurt, or angry; and in expressing empathy to others.

After Reading the Story

            Hold up the cover of the book and ask the children did Miss Spider want to eat the insects? (No, she wanted to have a party/tea with them).   Ask have the children ever been to a party?  What kinds of things do you do at a party?    How do you feel when you get to go to a party? (happy, it’s fun, I like to go). 

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Discovery

            Make sun tea.  Bring in a pitcher and several bags of decaffeinated fruit tea.  Put the tea bags in a full pitcher of water and place in the sun.  Observe it throughout the day as the tea gets darker.  Chill before drinking.  Serve with cookies for afternoon snack.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences, and comparisons among objects and materials.

            If you know of any spider web around your school, let the children observe it.  Remind them though to not touch spiders as many bite!

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences, and comparisons among objects and materials.

Music and Movement

            Put a pillow out in the center of the circle.  Have a child sit on the pillow and recite the poem, Little Miss Muffit.  Let the children take turns being Miss Muffit or Mr Muffit.  When you get to the part about along came a spider that sat down beside, change to include in front of, behind, and on top of. (dangle a spider prop from a string)

Little Miss/Mr Muffit

Sat on his tuffit/pillow

Eating her/his cottage cheese.

Along came a spider

And sat down (beside) her/him

And frightened Miss/Mr Muffit away.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems. AND Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; builds an increasing understanding of directionality, order, and positions of objects, and words such as up, down, over, under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front and behind.

Blocks

            Ask the children how many legs does a spider have? (8)  Show me something you can build with 8 blocks.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Art

            Make spiders out of play dough or clay.  Have the children roll balls out of play dough.  Put out pipe cleaners that have been cut into 1 inch and 2 inch lengths.  Let the children insert the legs into their spiders and put to the side to dry.  When the dough is dry the children can paint their spiders.

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities to create, drawings, paintings, models, and other creations that are more detailed, creative, or realistic.

Library and Writing

            Remind the children why Miss Spider was sad in the story (no one would come to her party because they were afraid she would eat them).   Ask what did Miss Spider really want to do?  (Have them come for a tea party).  Ask the children what kinds of things they like to do with their friends?  If you have a camera available, you could take pictures of each child doing things they like with their school friends and make it into a class book. If you do not have a camera, encourage the chhildren to draw their friends.

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; shows progress in developing relationships with peers.

Sand and Water

            Bring in grass cuttings from the playground or home.  Also add several sticks, stumps, and rocks.  Add plastic insects to the table.  Let the children arrange an insect habitat.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships. AND Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Dramatic Play

            Hang some crepe paper and encourage the children to have a party.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Math and Manipulatives

            Give each child a piece of paper.  Ask them to fold the paper in half.  On one side help them write Spider and on the other help them write Insect.  Remind the children that main character in the story was a spider.  How many legs does a spider have? (8).  Have the children draw a spider on the side of the paper that says spider.  Ask them if they know the scientific name for all the other bugs in the story (insects).  Tell the children that all insects have 6 legs.  Have the children draw an insect on the side of the page that says insect.  Encourage the children to write the numbers 8 and 6 on the corresponding sides of the page.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and in play.

Outdoor Play

            Bring some crepe paper outside and give the children 3 foot sections and show them how to weave it in and out through the fence.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Transitions

            Ask the children how many legs a spider has?  See if you can get to your next destination in 8 steps.  If not keep counting until you get there.  Ask the next child how many legs an insect has?  Have them count their steps.  Then have all the children count their steps to the next place they are going.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count to 10 and beyond.

Resources

Whistle for Willie, by Ezra Jack Keats

            Peter wants to be able to whistle.  He practices and practices and practices.  This book is a good example of the idea that practice makes perfect or if at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.

Materials

  • One paper plate per child.
  • A bright light that will make shadows on the wall
  • Several sponges cut into one-inch pieces and attached to a clip clothes pin.
  • Dachshund dog page for length or sorting

Vocabulary

  •  Proud (to feel pleased with yourself)
  •  Pride (to feel pleased or proud of yourself)
  •  Whistle (to make a sound by blowing through your lips)
  •  Whirl (to spin around and around)
  • Shadow (a darkened shape of something made by bright light, like the sun)

Before Reading the Story

            Ask the children if they know how to whistle.  Let them experiment.  Talk to them about how you have to try and try and try.  That to keep trying is called practice.  Explain to the children that something’s take lots of practice. Introduce the story by stating that today’s story is about a little boy named Peter who really wanted to be able to whistle.  Can you guess what he did (he practiced)?  Have the children repeat the motto; practice makes perfect.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Reading the Story

            As you go along, let the children try to whistle with Peter.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

After Reading the Story

            Ask the children how they think Peter felt after he finally learned to whistle (happy, proud, special)? Ask them if they have ever practiced and practiced something and then finally learned how to do it.  Did it make them feel proud? (I learned to ride my bike without trainer wheels on it.  I can write my name but I couldn’t when I was three, I can almost make my bed)  Write a list of the children’s ideas.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; demonstrates growing confidence in a range of abilities and expresses pride in accomplishments.

Discovery

            Find a place in your school where the children can easily see and make shadows.  Show the children that their shadow does what they do although the shape of it might be different.  Let the children experiment with shadows and shadow play.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships.

Music and Movement

Do the following poem with the children.

I’m whirling, I’m twirling, I’m whirling all around

Faster and faster then I sit upon the ground.

I’m whirling, I’m twirling. I’m whirling all around

Slower and slower them I sit upon the ground.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

            Practice whistling!

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks, activities, projects, and experiences.

Bring in a whistle. Explain to the children that when you blow the whistle they are to walk forward. When you blow it again, they are to walk backward. Do this several times and see if they are able to follow the directions. Or blow once to jump and twice to skip, etc..

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Blocks

Depending upon the size of the blocks in your center, encourage the children to build a structure that the can hide inside of or a structures that a people/animal manipulatives can hide inside of. As you go over to check on the children play Teacher Says. Teacher says hide inside your structure. Teacher says stand beside your structure. Teacher says make your body lower than your structure. Teacher says hide behind your structure.

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; builds increasing understanding of directionality, order, and positions of objects, and words such as up, down, over, under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front, behind.

Art

            Show the children how to print by using a sponge.  Pinch a piece pf sponge with the clip clothespin. SHow the children how to dip the sponge into paint and then print (up and down, up and down) across their paper or around the edges. This will get some of the same effect as the illustrations in the book.

Creative Arts/Art; gains ability in using different art media and materials in a variety of ways for creative expression and representation.

Library and Writing

            Explain to the children that you are going to make an I Am Proud book.  Have the children review things that they have done that make them feel happy and pleased with themselves.  Ask them to draw what their face looks like when they are proud onto the paper plate.  On the back of each plate write what makes them proud.  Punch holes in the plates and attach together with a piece of yarn. (My Mom let me feed my brother said Kerry, I did my own seatbelt yesterday said Tammie, I buttoned all my buttons, even the little one said Roger)

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; demonstrates growing confidence in a range of abilities and expresses pride in accomplishments.

Sand and Water

Dramatic Play

            Remind the children that in the story Peter wanted to feel grown-up so he put on his father’s hat.  Ask the children what clothes in your dramatic center could make them feel grown up?  Encourage them to try the clothes on. Challenge them to do their own buttons, zippers, velcro, and snaps.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; shows growing independence in hygiene, nutrition, and personal care when eating, dressing, washing hands, brushing teeth, and toileting.

Math and Manipulatives

Cut out the dashund dogs and challenge the children to arrange them from shortest to longest. Or cut out several of each length dog and sort them.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows growth in matching, sorting, putting in series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as shape or size.

Outdoor Play

If you have any whistle or whistle slides (think Dollar Store) bring them in for the children to enjoy.

            Take colored chalk outside and let the children color on the sidewalk.  Can they write their name? Can they draw various shapes? If you do not have a place to use colored chalk, try writing in the dirt with sticks.

Literacy/Early Writing; experiments with a growing variety of writing tools and materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computers.

In the story there was a girl jumping rope.  For older children encourage them to practice this skill.

Physical Health & Development/Gross Motor Skills; shows increasing levels of proficiency, control, and balance in walking, climbing, running, jumping, hopping, skipping, and galloping.

Transitions

            As each child leaves the group, ask them to try to whistle. After their attempt, remind them that practice makes perfect.

Approaches to Learning/Engagement & Persistence; grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks, activities, projects, and experiences.

Resources

Jesse Bear, What Will You Wear? by Nancy White Carlstrom

Materials

  •         Pictures of a variety of clothes to make a jumping bean game
  •          One paper plate per child.

Vocabulary

Before Reading the Story

            Talk to the children about the clothing that they are wearing.   Does the time of year affect the clothing that the children are wearing?  Is anyone wearing their favorite article of clothing or their favorite color?  Did the children wear outer clothing to school today, why?  Ask the children if they ever get to pick out their clothes to wear to school? Look at the cover of the book and read the title.  Ask the children if they can guess which shirt Jesse Bear will pick to wear.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes. AND Social & Emotional Development/Self Concept; begins to develop and express awareness self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Reading the Story

            As you read through the pages, stop and let the children talk about what is happening on each page and what name articles of clothing that they see.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction, non-fiction books, and poetry.

After Reading the Story

            After reading the story, talk to the children about some of the different items of clothes that are worn for night and day.  Then teach the children to play Jumping Bean.  To play, cut out the clothing items and glue them to strips of cardboard.  Put all the strips of cardboard into an envelope cut in half so the clothing pictures are inside the envelope.  Also include several jumping beans.  The children take turns pulling out a cardboard strip and naming the item of clothing.  If they pull out a bean they shout Jumping Bean! And everyone then jumps up and down.  The play continues until all the cardboard strips have been picked.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities.

Discovery

            Put out bubble blowing supplies either commercial or home made.  Experiment with different kinds of blowers.  Do different shaped blowers make different shaped bubbles? What happens when you touch a bubble with a dry hand versus a wet hand? How hard must you blow to make one big bubble? Many small bubbles?

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships.

Music and Movement

            Jessie Bear wears pants that dance.  Put on some music and let the children dance.  Pretend that your pants make you dance until the music stoops and then you freeze.

Creative Arts/Movement; expresses through movement and dancing what is felt and heard in various musical tempos and styles.

            Sing Rhyming Words Sound the Same to first 4 stanzas of The Mexican Hat Dance. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-Rqdgna3Yw

Rhyming words sound the same, rhyming words sound the same

Rhyming words sound the same, rhyming words sound the same.

(chanted) Can you think of a word that rhymes with red, pants, rose, chair, etc?

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; progresses in recognizing matching sounds and rhymes in familiar words, games, songs, stories, and poems.

Do the poem Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear but change it to Jesse Bear, Jesse Bear.

Jesse Bear, Jesse Bear turn around

Jesse Bear, Jesse Bear touch the ground.

Jesse Bear, Jesse Bear touch your shoe

Jesse Bear, Jesse bear show me blue.

Jesse Bear, Jesse Bear stretch up high

Jesse Bear, Jesse Bear touch the sky.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Blocks

            If you have colored blocks put them out today and encourage the children to talk about the colors as they build.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and vfor other varied purposes.

Art

            In the story Jessie Bear eats a variety of foods for lunch.  Let the children cut out food pictures and glue them to a paper plate.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Library and Writing

            Use flannel board dressing dolls or find a set on the internet (look up paper dolls) and make for the children to use. https://www.designeatrepeat.com/printable-paper-dolls/ After the child has dressed the doll, talk about the names of the clothing items, the colors, what one usually does wearing that type of clothing.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Sand and Water

            Add water and dish soap. Give the children egg beaters and/or hand whippers to make the bubbles form.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships.

Dramatic Play

            Encourage the children to play using night rituals and morning rituals as their theme.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Math and Manipulatives

            Play a graphing game with your children.  Make a large X on the floor using masking tape.  Explain to the children that you are going to become a human graph.  Ask all the children who are wearing Velcro shoes to stand in one area, all those wearing tie shoes to stand in another, and those with buckles.  Which has the most?  Now have the children move and divide by long sleeves, short sleeves, sleeveless or shirts with letters, shirts with pictures, and shirts that are solid.  Continue in this manner naming different ways to graph clothing articles and seeing which has most and least.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND begins to use language to compare numbers of objects with terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, equal to.

Outdoor Play

            Digging in the sand today with a shovel and hand. Can the children work together to make a giant moutain?

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & practices; participates actively in games, outdoor play, and other forms of exercise that enhance physical fitness. AND Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; shows increasing abilities to use compromise and discussion in working, playing, and resolving conflict with peers.

Transitions

            Ask the children to name an item of clothing that they would wear on their foot, their head, when it is cold, when it is hot, at bedtime, in the day time, on special occasions, etc.

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task, or problem.

cut and use for jumping beans game