Sip,Slurp,Soup,Soup,Caldo, Caldo,Caldo by Diane Gonzales Bertrand

            Mother is busy in the kitchen making soup and the family is waiting.  This book goes through the steps to prepare the soup and readers will get caught up in the family’s anticipation for Mother’s delicious caldo.

Materials

  •  Corn tortillas
  •  Alphabet stickers
  •  Soup bowl alphabet seek and find
  •  Large pot and ladle
  • Dice
  • Plastic spoon per child
  • Several cardboard circle as a tortilla pattern
  • Several plastic knives for playdough cutting
  • Chalk for outside

Vocabulary

  •             Caldo (a special broth used to make soup) A kind of vegetable soup

Before Reading the Story

            Bring a variety of plastic foods or food picture cards to the rug.  Tell the children that you are going to pretend to make vegetable soup today.  Hold up the foods and ask the children to name it. Is this a vegetable?  If it is, put it into the pot.  If it is not, put it to the side.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Reading the Story

Encourage the children to repeat lines in the story of “caldo, caldo, caldo” and “tortilla, tortilla, tortilla”.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest in reading-related activities, such as asking to have a favorite book read; choosing to look at books; drawing pictures based on stories; asking to take books home; going to the library; and engaging in pretend-reading with other children.

After reading the Story

            Tell the children that you are going to pretend that you are making alphabet soup.  Draw a large bowl onto a piece of paper.  Ask the children to show you what three looks like on their fingers (hold up 3 fingers) and then put an alphabet letter on each/each child will receive three stickers.  After all the children have 3 stickers, point to an alphabet chart and say “if you have the letter R that looks like this you can come put it in the soup bowl”.  As the children put their letters on the paper bowl, encourage them to make the letter sounds with you. Continue choosing letters until all the children have put their letters into the soup.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; shows progress in associating the names of letters with their shapes and sounds.

Discovery

            Bring in corn tortillas for the children to roll up and try.  Are you eating anything for lunch that they can try to use their tortilla as a straw? Make a chart; Like-Dislike Tortillas. Have the children mark their preference.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences. AND Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means, including discussion, drawings, maps, and charts.

Music and Movement

Do the Jack Hartmann song Special Soup https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXqEty5dA1Y

Sing The Soup is Boiling Up to the tune of The Farmer in the Dell. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnVxTT42Kik

The soup is boiling up,

The soup is boiling up,

Stir it slow around we go,

The soup is boiling up.

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing awareness of beginning and ending sounds in words.

Blocks

Bring out any alphabet blocks that you have today. If you do not have alphabet blocks, you can put stickers onto your regular blocks. Encourage the children to write their names, copy simple words such as soup and caldo amd to name any letters that they can identify.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; identifies at least 10 letters of the alphabet, especially those in their own name.

Art

            Use play dough and rollers to roll the play dough out very thin. Use the cardboard circles and plastic knives to cut out tortillas.  Or show the children how to make a ball of play dough and work it out into a tortilla.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Sand and Water

            Put any plastic vegetables you might have in the water table so the children can wash them and pretend to be making soup. Include the soup pot and ladle. Can the children name the vegetables as they ladle them into the pot?

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Library and Writing

            Bring the soup bowl picture from group to the table.  Give each child another sticker or just show/name a letter.  Ask the child to then use a colored pencil to circle the one/s just like this.  (Kerry you find the T that looks like this and Roger you find the R just like in your name).  Or you can use the soup bowl to find and circle all the letters in the child’s name.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; shows progress in associating the names of letters with their shapes and sounds. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing, and art tolls, including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes, and various types of technology.

Dramatic play

            Tell the children that the vegetables are being washed in the water table so let’s make something else today.  Ask the children to tell you about some of their favorite foods that their mother might cook.  Encourage them to pretend to prepare them for you.  Add paper so if they need to make a grocery list.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Math and Manipulatives

            Give each child a plastic bowl.  Put out a pile of counters, any kind will work.  Tell the children that you are going to make ______soup (my counters were bears so we made bear soup).  Take turns rolling the dice and putting the correct number of bears/counters into the bowls using a plastic spoon.  Pretend to eat the bear soup as the children take the bears in and out of the bowl while they count.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Outdoor Play

On the cement use the chalk to make an alphabet line. Make each letter about six inches tall and spaced out so that the children can jump from letter to letter. Some letters can be closer together and others further apart. Show the children how to start on letter A and jump and sing the alphabet to Z.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; knopws the letters of the alphabet are a special category of visual graphics that can be individually named. AND Physical Health and Development/Gross Motor Skills;shows increasing levels of proficiency, control, nad balance in walking, climbing, running, jumping, hopping, skipping, marching, and galloping.

Transitions

Let the children take turns picking a hot/cold card and taping it onto the correct side of a large paper titled Hot / Cold.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; develops growing awareness of ideas and language related to attributes of time and temperature.

Resources

Can you find the letters in your name in the bowl of soup?

Mama Provi and the Pot of Rice, by Sylvia Rosa-Casanova

            When Lucy gets the chicken pox, Mama Provi knows just what she needs to feel better.  She cooks up some arroz con pollo and heads up the eight flights of stairs to her grand daughters apartment.  On the way she meets some of her neighbors and the simple meal turns into a feast.

Materials

  • Local real-estate advertisements.  Two of each to use for matching.
  • Face picture
  • Dice
  • Picture of stairs
  • Animals in their homes

Vocabulary

  • Apartment  (a home in a large building that has more than one home in it).
  • Dozen (12 of something)
  • Tremendous (something really great or wonderful)

Introducing the Reading the Story

            Ask the children if they know if they live in a house or an apartment? If you do not have any children who live in an apartment, show the children a picture of one, or draw one and explain that it has many floors that people live on.  Sometimes there is an elevator and sometimes there are only stairs.  Show the children the book cover and tell the children that Mama Provi lives in an apartment.  She lives on the bottom floor and her grand daughter lives on the top floor.  Read the title of the book and ask the children if they can guess why Mama Provi might be carrying a pot of rice up to her granddaughter Lucy. 

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing abilities to classify, compare, and contrast objects, events, and experiences.

Reading the Story

            As Mama Provi goes up each flight of stairs, huff and puff a little as though you are slightly out of breath. 

After Reading the Story

 In the story Lucy had the Chickenpox.  Ask the children if they have ever had the chickenpox or been sick in bed.  Who took care of you, what did they do to make you feel better?  

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; progresses in understanding similarities and respecting differences among people, such as genders, race, special needs, culture, language, and family structures. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Music and Movement 

            Play the Pretend game.  Pretend to carry something heavy.  Pretend to carry something wiggly, something enormous, and something very small. 

Creative Arts/ Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Teach the children The Elevator Song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfrn5_v_eCM Make your bodies go up and down with the song.

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; builds an increasing understanding of directionality, order, and positions of objects, and words such as up, down, over,under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front, and behind.

Do the song, Let’s Go Riding an Elevator using scarves to act out. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sOlpdcEjsQ

Creative Arts/ Movement; shows growth in moving in time to different patterns of beat and rhythm in music.

Discovery

            Bring in pictures or books about animals and their homes.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Blocks

            Give the children 10 cube shaped blocks or similar shaped blocks and challenge them to build stairs. 

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; progresses in ability to put together and take shapes apart.

Art

            Encourage the children to draw a large head shape, or use the one provided.  Let the children use bingo daubers or their fingers to make chicken pocks on the head shape.  The children can also personalize by adding hair or extending features.

Creative Arts/Art; gains ability in using different art media and materials in a variety of ways for creative expression and representation.

Sand and Water

            If your center allows, add rice to the table for pouring and scooping.  If not, try birdseed as it makes the same kind of soothing sound when being scooped and poured. 

Library and Writing

            Give each child a picture of the stairs and encourage them to copy or write the numbers on each level.  They can then cut out pictures of food to glue on the picture, or draw a picture of their own favorite food/s. 

Physical Health & Development; Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing, and art tools, including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes, and various types of technology. AND Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Dramatic Play

            Bring in gift bags or shopping bags that the children can use in their play today.

Encourage the children to do some delicious cooking.  Can they name all the pretend foods in your dramatic center? 

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary. 

Math and Manipulatives

            Put the picture of the face on the table and explain to the children that when a person has the chicken pox that they get a rash that is all spotty.  Let the children take turns rolling the dice.  They can count the number of spots on the dice and then use a marker to make the corresponding spots on the face picture.  As the children continue to add spots make comments about how the face sure has many chicken pox! 

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to use one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Outdoor Play

            Use mud, sand, dirt, rocks, and other natural ingredients to cook a yummy feast today. 

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Transitions

            In the story everyone made their food trades “En un dos port res” which means lickedty split or quickly.  As the children move to the next activity ask them to move En un dos port tres or lickedty split. 

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Resources

Dear Parent,

            Cooking is a wonderful way to share an experience with your child.  While cooking you are introducing your child to math (add 2 cups of _______, ¼ teaspoon ____) and also science concepts (what happens to an egg when you add heat?  What happens when you mix milk with flour?).  Find a simple recipe that you and your child can make together.

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Gregory the Terrible Eater, by Mitchell Sharmat

            Gregory is a picky eater.  Imagine a goat who does not like old tires and shirt buttons? Gregory would prefer to eat things like eggs and orange juice, revolting!  How does he learn to try new foods?  This silly story will delight any picky eater.

Materials

  • Food magazines and a paper plate per child
  • Ahead of time, ask the parents to send in labels from foods the children have eaten at home (soup label, cereal box, granola wrapper)
  • A Food Pyramid for children 
  • Food cards (Made into a domino game/Make sure to include at least six of each kind).
  • Parachute or sheet
  • 5 brown grocery bags or boxes

Vocabulary

  •             Average (just like everybody else)
  •             Fussy eater (picky eater)
  •             Revolting (nasty)
  •             Develop (learn to like)

Before Reading the Story

            Ask the children if they know what it is to be a picky or fussy eater.  Has anyone ever called them that?  Tell them that the story today is about a goat that was a fussy eater.  Ask if anyone knows what goats eat (everything)?  Let’s find out about Gregory the goat. Introduce the book.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Reading the Story

After Reading the Story

            In the story, Gregory ate too much junk food; can you recall some of the things he ate?  Ask the children to help you make a list of people junk foods.  Show them on a food pyramid how little junk food they should be eating versus other foods.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

Discovery

            Make several sets of the food card dominos and cover them with contact paper for the children to name the foods as they play.

Mathematics/Patterns Measurement; shows increasing abilities to match, sort, out in a series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size. AND Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games and in using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.

Music and Movement

            Sing Happily We Eat Our Foods to the tune of Merrily We Roll Along. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xf0Y5m4aVF0

Happily we eat our food, eat our food, eat our food

Happily we eat our food to grow up big and strong.

(Hold up a food picture card and sing about it)

 Happily we eat our carrots, eat our carrots, eat our carrots

Happily we eat our carrots to grow up big and strong

(ask the children which food category the food belongs to and then do another)

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; develops increasing ability to find more than one answer to a question, task, or problem.

Blocks

Art

            Make sure you have plenty of magazines with food pictures for the children to cut out.  Then give each child a paper plate that is divided into four sections.  Ask the children to make a balanced meal by cutting the food pictures and gluing them to the plate.  Remind them to look for a fruit, a vegetable, a protein and a milk product.  Glue each type to a different part of the plate.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and respect for their bodies and the environment.

Sand and Water

            Put play foods into the water table for the children to wash and sort. 

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows increasing abilities to match, sort, put in a series, and regroup objects according to one or two attributes such as shape and size.

Library and Writing

            Bring the food label collection to a wall space and let the children help tape them to the wall.  You can either put them on your word wall under the correct beginning letter or make a collage type arrangement and then ask the children to show you which are their favorite three items.  Write their name beside the item.

Social & Emotional Development/Self-Concept; begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Dramatic play

            Encourage the children to cook nutritious meals in the kitchen.  Can they name the foods?  Can they tell which food group the food belongs in?

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Math and Manipulatives

            Make another set of the food dominos and cut out the foods to be individual cards.  Make a food pyramid on a piece of large paper and tape it to the wall.  For each food group write the number of servings per day.  The children can then sort the food pictures (add more from magazines) and put the correct amount of foods into each food category.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Outdoor Play

            Take your plastic foods outside along with 5 brown grocery bags.  On the front of one write grains and draw some pasta, on another write vegetables, fruits, meats, and milks.  Have the children grab onto the edges of a parachute or queen sized sheet.  Put several of the plastic foods in the center and let the children see if they can bounce them around the parachute/sheet.  If one falls off a child can then take it and put it into the appropriate bag. 

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; participates actively in games, outdoor play, and other forms of physical exercise that enhance physical fitness.

Transitions

Have the children stand in a circle and put the bags (from Outdoor Play) in the center.  The teacher tosses a food to a child who them must name it and put it in the proper food group bag.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasingly complex and varied spoken language.

Resources