Miss Spider’s Tea Party, the counting book, by David Kirk

            Miss Spider is lonely.  She can not understand why none of the insects want to come to her tea party?  Count the insects as they meet Miss Spider.

Materials

  • Pitcher and about 4-6 decaffeinated fruit tea bags.
  • Crepe paper
  • A spider hung from a string ( this can be stuffed, rubber, or paper)
  • Camera

Vocabulary

  • To dash off (to run off quickly)
  • Tea party ( a party where you drink tea and eat sweets)

Before Reading the Story

            Hang a large piece of paper where all the children can see it.  Ask the children to see if they can guess what you are drawing.  Draw a simple spider on the paper.  When the children have guessed spider, have them count the eight legs with you.  Tell the children that it has to have 8 legs to be a spider. Now draw another spider but only put on 5 legs.  Ask the children if this is a spider?  (No because it only has 5 legs)  Add 3 more.  Do this several times making another spider with 8 legs and two more with more or less legs.  How many legs does a spider have to have?  Tell the children that our story today is about a spider.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Reading the Story

            Make sure to take time to let the children help count the insects on each page.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

On the children the page where Miss Spider is wiping her tears (Miss Spider sobbed, “They’ve all dashed off”).  Ask them why they think all the insects dashed off? (Because spiders eat insects). 

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; progresses in responding sympathetically to peers who are in need, upset, hurt, or angry; and in expressing empathy to others.

After Reading the Story

            Hold up the cover of the book and ask the children did Miss Spider want to eat the insects? (No, she wanted to have a party/tea with them).   Ask have the children ever been to a party?  What kinds of things do you do at a party?    How do you feel when you get to go to a party? (happy, it’s fun, I like to go). 

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Discovery

            Make sun tea.  Bring in a pitcher and several bags of decaffeinated fruit tea.  Put the tea bags in a full pitcher of water and place in the sun.  Observe it throughout the day as the tea gets darker.  Chill before drinking.  Serve with cookies for afternoon snack.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences, and comparisons among objects and materials.

            If you know of any spider web around your school, let the children observe it.  Remind them though to not touch spiders as many bite!

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences, and comparisons among objects and materials.

Music and Movement

            Put a pillow out in the center of the circle.  Have a child sit on the pillow and recite the poem, Little Miss Muffit.  Let the children take turns being Miss Muffit or Mr Muffit.  When you get to the part about along came a spider that sat down beside, change to include in front of, behind, and on top of. (dangle a spider prop from a string)

Little Miss/Mr Muffit

Sat on his tuffit/pillow

Eating her/his cottage cheese.

Along came a spider

And sat down (beside) her/him

And frightened Miss/Mr Muffit away.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems. AND Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; builds an increasing understanding of directionality, order, and positions of objects, and words such as up, down, over, under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front and behind.

Blocks

            Ask the children how many legs does a spider have? (8)  Show me something you can build with 8 blocks.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Art

            Make spiders out of play dough or clay.  Have the children roll balls out of play dough.  Put out pipe cleaners that have been cut into 1 inch and 2 inch lengths.  Let the children insert the legs into their spiders and put to the side to dry.  When the dough is dry the children can paint their spiders.

Creative Arts/Art; progresses in abilities to create, drawings, paintings, models, and other creations that are more detailed, creative, or realistic.

Library and Writing

            Remind the children why Miss Spider was sad in the story (no one would come to her party because they were afraid she would eat them).   Ask what did Miss Spider really want to do?  (Have them come for a tea party).  Ask the children what kinds of things they like to do with their friends?  If you have a camera available, you could take pictures of each child doing things they like with their school friends and make it into a class book. If you do not have a camera, encourage the chhildren to draw their friends.

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; shows progress in developing relationships with peers.

Sand and Water

            Bring in grass cuttings from the playground or home.  Also add several sticks, stumps, and rocks.  Add plastic insects to the table.  Let the children arrange an insect habitat.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe processes and relationships. AND Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Dramatic Play

            Hang some crepe paper and encourage the children to have a party.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Math and Manipulatives

            Give each child a piece of paper.  Ask them to fold the paper in half.  On one side help them write Spider and on the other help them write Insect.  Remind the children that main character in the story was a spider.  How many legs does a spider have? (8).  Have the children draw a spider on the side of the paper that says spider.  Ask them if they know the scientific name for all the other bugs in the story (insects).  Tell the children that all insects have 6 legs.  Have the children draw an insect on the side of the page that says insect.  Encourage the children to write the numbers 8 and 6 on the corresponding sides of the page.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects. AND Literacy/Early Writing; begins to represent stories and experiences through pictures, dictation, and in play.

Outdoor Play

            Bring some crepe paper outside and give the children 3 foot sections and show them how to weave it in and out through the fence.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Transitions

            Ask the children how many legs a spider has?  See if you can get to your next destination in 8 steps.  If not keep counting until you get there.  Ask the next child how many legs an insect has?  Have them count their steps.  Then have all the children count their steps to the next place they are going.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count to 10 and beyond.

Resources

One Monkey Too Many, by Jackie French Koller

            What happens when the monkeys do not listen?  Watch the crazy adventures of these as they forget to follow the rules.

Materials

  • Barrel of Monkeys (I have found this game in the Dollar Store)
  • Pictures of safe/unsafe play

Vocabulary

Before reading the Story

            Ask the children why they think that we have rules at school and at home?  What do they think would happen if everybody ignored the rules and did what they wanted?  Tell the children that the story today is about some monkeys who did not listen to the rules.  Ask the children if they can guess what is going to happen in the story to the monkeys? Introduce the book.

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiencecs; to act out stories in dramatic play; to predict what will happen next in a story.

Reading the Story

            Stop on every page that talks about one monkey too many and let the children make comments if they choose.

Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

After reading the Story

            Were the monkeys being safe in this story?  In the story it looks funny but what can really happen if we are not safe?  What can you do if someone asks you to do something that you do not think is safe?  Teach the children that they can say “No, no I won’t go!”  Have them practice this several times and then ask them some questions and have them repeat, “No, no I won’t go!”  What if your friend said let’s play in my Mom’s car (no-no I won’t go!).  What if you wanted to cross the street and the light was red.  What if a stranger said to come here because they had some candy they wanted to give you.  What if someone you know says look I’ve got matches we can play with.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities.

Discovery

Put out all the pictures of safe/insafe play. Have the children sort them and then talk about why a picture is unsafe.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities. AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for other varied purposes.

Music and Movement

            Play Monkey See, Monkey Do.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdCLvwK8I6c Have everyone stand in a circle.  The teacher is the first leader and the children are the monkeys.  As you chant or sing the verse, everyone follows the leader.  At the end of the verse the leader points to another who then becomes the new leader.

When you clap, clap, clap your hands

The monkeys clap, clap, clap their hands.

Monkeys see and Monkeys do,

Monkeys do the same as you!

(Jump up and down, twirl, hop on one foot, hoot out loud, make a silly face)

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

            Sing There Were 5 in the Bed   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1_dxT7efcs. Hold up the appropriate number of fingers for each verse and make a fist rolling your knuckles on the floor when you sing roll over, roll over.

There were 5 in the bed and the little one said,

Roll over, roll over.

So they all rolled over and one fell out

There were 4 in the bed and the little one said,

Roll over, roll over….

There were 2 in the bed and the little one said,

Roll over, roll over

So they all rolled over and one fell out,

There was one in the bed and the little said Goodnight!

Mathematics/Number & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quantity.

Tell the children that they are going to pretend to be driving cars. Remind them to fasten their seatbelts. Turn on music and the children can move around pretending to drive. tell them that when the music stops that they must quickly freeze so that they will not have an accident. Put on the music again and drive, then freeze, etc..

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions. AND Physical Health & Development/Gross Motor Skills; shows increasing levels of proficiency, control, and balance walking, climbing, running, jumping, hopping, skipping, marching, and galloping.

Blocks

            Put out any transportation vehicles you might have.  As the children build, encourage them to count how many.  Can they add one more? (I see that you have 5 cars in the garage, is there room for one more? Now how many)? For older children you can ask, “If you have 5 cars and 2 more drove into the garage, now how many are in the garage?

Mathematics/Numbers & Operations; develops increased abilities to combine, separate and name “how many” concrete objects.

Art

            Encourage the children to just collage using a variety of materials. 

Creative Arts/Art; develops growing abilities to plan, work independently, and demonstrate care and persistence in a variety of art projects.

Sand and Water

Put sand and pouring toys in the table today. When it is clean-up or if too much sand gets on the floor, remind the children to sweep it up because sand can be slippery. Safety first.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities.

Library and Writing

Make a graph of letters in your name.  Write each child’s name on an index card.  Ask them first if they can name the letters and then ask them to count how many letters are in their name.  Write their name above the correct number of letters.  As you share this with the children you can say.  Kerry has 5 letters and Tammie has one more.  How many letters does Tammie have in it?  Help the children to count.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Math and Manipulatives

            Ask each child to show you two counters (these can be anything you have lots of; links, cubes, bear counters).  Ask them to take one more and now tell you how many they have.  Ask them to take one more, now how many?  Continue to 10 then ask them to take away one.  Now how many?  Ask them to takeaway one more, now how many?  Go all the way down to zero.

Mathematics/Numbers & Operations; develops increased abilities to combine, separate and name “how many” concrete objects.

          Put out the game Barrel of Monkeys and encourage the children to make long monkey chains. How many monkeys are on your chain?

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count to ten and beyond. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills;grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, string beads, and using scissors.

Outdoor Play

            Practice different kinds of rolling.  Can you make you body long and roll? Can you curl like a ball and roll, can you roll without using your arms, can you roll very fast?

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; progresses in physical growth, strength, stamina, and flexibility.

On the way to the playground, stop and pretend that you are crossing a street. Have the children look left, any cars? Now look right, any cars? Check left one more time and then cross the pretend street.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities.

Transitions

Give each child a picture of safe/not safe cards. Ask them to tell you if it is safe or not safe. Ask them to tell you why.

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances, and activities.

Resources

Over in the Meadow, by Ezra Jack Keats

            This old Appalachian counting rhyme comes to life with Mr. Keats bright illustrations.  If you know the tune, this is a wonderful book to sing and act out with your children. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIDHDfk3sm8 (Make sure to change up the words to match the version of the book you are using).

Materials

  • Copy of each animal in the story plus 6 other animals not found in a meadow
  • Meadow, not meadow sort page

Vocabulary

  • Meadow (a grassy field that has a stream running through it.)
  • Basking (to lie in the sun)

Before Reading the Story

            Tell the children that your story today is called over in the meadow.  Ask them if they think they know what a meadow is?  Show a picture or draw one on a chalkboard explaining the parts of a meadow (Draw a grassy area, a stream, some trees, and a gate).  Tell them that many kinds of animals live in meadows.  Ask them if they can think of any that might like to live in this one.  Make a list of animals that they name.

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes.

Reading the Story

            If you know the tune for this story, sing it instead of reading it.  Hold up your fingers on each page and let the children say the number.  Note if any animal is on the children’s list from above (Hey Kerry, you said a fish!)

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

After Reading the Story

            Go back and do a picture walk.  On each page have the children do the action and ask them if they know the sounds the animals make.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Discovery

            If you have an old aquarium, set it up with a habitat for a small creature that is familiar to your children.  Bring one in for a few days so the children can observe it.  Put out magnifying glasses, paper and pencils for recording their observations.  (We get toads on our playground which the children love to catch, we bring one or two inside for a day to observe.  We have also made a Roly Poly habitat, a catfish tank, and a worm habitat).

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means, including discussion, drawings, maps, and charts.

Music and Movement

            Count from zero to ten and back again.  Use your fingers to hold up and take down as you count.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; develops increasing ability to count to 10 and beyond.

            Re-sing the book with the children.  On each page, have the children clap the appropriate number of times.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Teach the poem, Beehive.

Here is the beehive,                                  Make a fist

But where are the bees?                            Shrug shoulders

Hiding away, where nobody sees                    Look down at fist

 I hear them now, they’re in the hive               Put fist up to ear

 Out come the bees, 1,2,3,4,5.                             Hold up fingers as you count

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Blocks

            Bring in a box of items that the children can use with your rubber/plastic animals to make habitats (Styrofoam block, rocks, sticks, cloth square).

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Art

            Cut large pieces of green construction paper in half.  On each half, draw a line 2/3 the way across the long ways.  Have the children cut fringe on the paper stopping each time at the line.  After they have cut “the meadow grass”, encourage them to draw an animal or person to go into the meadow.  Tape all the fringed pieces of paper onto the wall in rows then slide the animals/people in between.  Make a label that says Over in the Meadow.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing, and art tools including pencils, amarkers, paint brushes, and various other types of technology.

Sand and Water

            Bring in grass clippings and small animals.  Pretend your table is a meadow today.

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Library and Writing

            Have several children sit with you and the book.  Ask the children questions about each page.  Who is this?  What are they doing?  What is basking?  Do you ever bask in the sun?

Science/Scientific Knowledge; expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe, and discuss the natural world, materials, living things, and natural processes. AND Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Dramatic Play

            Parent and baby play today.  Who is the mother?  What will you teach your children to do today? (Set the table, change the baby, get dressed up)

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; participates in a variety of dramatic play activities that become more extended and complex.

Math and Manipulatives

            Cut and contact the animal pictures.  Have the children sort the pictures by those that live in the meadow and those that do not live in the meadow. 

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; begins to make comparisons between several objects based on a single attribute.

Outdoor Play

            Make a hopscotch board and practice jumping and hopping to the numbers.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numbers in meaningful ways. AND Physical Health & Development/Gross Motor Skills; shows increasing levels of proficiency, control, and balance in walking, climbing, running, jumping, hopping, skipping, marching, and galloping.

Transitions

Play, 1-2-3 What Number Do You See? Make two fists and bump them together as you say 1-2-3. As you say What number do you see? Hold up 1-10 fingers. Ask a child to answer before they head off to the next activity.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness if numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quantity.

Resources

Over in the Meadow