Caps for Sale, by Esphyer Slobodkina

             A peddler goes out to sell his caps and falls asleep under a tree. When he wakes up, his caps are gone!  Who could have taken them?  Read this classic children’s story to discover the mystery of what became of the caps.

Materials

  •             Caps page

Vocabulary

  •             Peddler (a salesman who sells an item door to door)
  •             Cap (a kind of hat)

Before Reading the Story

            Ask the children if any of them have a hat at home? Can they tell you about their hat?  Does it serve a purpose? (I have to wear my ball hat when I watch my big brother play little league, I wear my hat to keep the sun out of my eyes when I go fishing.  I have a hat I wear when I get dressed up on Sunday).  Or bring in several kinds of hats from the dramatic center or home. (The fireman wears that hat to keep the fire off his head, the construction hat is hard so you won’t hurt your head if something falls on it). 

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families and Communities; develops growing awareness of jobs and what is required of them.

Reading the Story

            If you have a cap type hat, bring it in and wear it while telling the story.  Introduce the book and note who is behind the tree. Ask the children to predict what they think the story might be about.   When you read the page where he is refreshed and rested, ask the children if they notice anything (all but one cap is gone).  What do you think is going to happen?

Approaches to Learning/Reasoning & Problem Solving; grows in recognizing and solving problems through exploration including discussions with peers and adults. AND Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

After Reading the Story

            Talk about the book with the children. Does anyone remember what a cap is?  Where do you wear a cap?  Did the peddler sell any of his caps?  Why did he want to sell his caps?  Have you ever been very hungry, how did it make you feel?  What happened when the peddler took a nap?  Why do you think he got so angry?  What did the monkeys do when he stomped his foot?  How did the peddler get all his hats back from the monkeys?  What did the peddler call out as he walked with the hats on his head? 

Literacy/Book Knowledge & Appreciation; demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.

            Ask the children if they would like to act out the story.  If so, choose a peddler and have all the other children pretend to be monkeys.  

Creative Arts/Dramatic Play; shows growing creativity and imagination in using materials and in assuming different roles in dramatic play situations.

Discovery

            Make a color match game.  Use the caps pattern and make caps of various colors.  On an index card write the color names using a coordinating color marker or crayon.  The children can then sort the caps by color. Are your children proficient in sorting by color? Make hats of various sizes and colors for the children to sort and/or put in series of small to large.,

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; shows increasing abilities to match, sort, put in a series, and regrouping objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size.

Music and Movement

            Let the children take turns leading in this Monkey See, Monkey Do song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_o3EyR8tww (I like to sing this song slower than the video shows).

When you shake, shake, shake, shake your fist

The monkey shakes, shakes, shakes his fist

Monkeys see and monkeys do

Monkeys do the same as you!

(Jump up and down, twirl around, touch your toes, stomp your foot)

Creative Arts/Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plays, games, and performances.

            In the story, the peddler balances a huge amount of caps upon his head.  Get out the beanbags and let the children practice balancing beanbags on different parts of their bodies while moving to music.  Who can balance more than one? 

Physical Health and Development/Gross Motor; shows increasing levels of proficiency, control, and balance in walking, marching, hopping, or jumping. 

Sing I’ve Got a Penny

I’ve got a penny; I’ve got a penny

I’ve got a penny shiny and new.

I’m going to buy all kinds of _______

That’s what I’m going to do!

(Children can fill in blank with what they will buy.  You can let the children pick coins out of a container and then the child must name the coin and the class can sing about the coin value in place of a penny.  I’ve got a nickel; I’ve got a dime, quarter).

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Blocks

            In the story the Peddler stacked his hats.  Encourage the children to do stacking today.  How many blocks tall can they stack before the pile falls over? Remind the children about your stacking rules before they begin. (Build no higher than your elbow and you can only knock down your stack).

Mathematics/Number & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quantity. AND Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads, and using scissors.

Art   

            Put out paper plates and collage materials.  The children can design their own hats to wear.  Attach long pieces of yarns in two places opposite.  These can be used to tie the hat under the child’s chin. 

Creative Arts/Art; Gains ability in using different art media and materials in a variety of ways for creative expression and representation.

Library and Writing

            Caps starts with the /c/ sound.  What other words can the children think of that starts with this sound?  Make a list. 

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; shows growing awareness of beginning and ending sounds of words.

Non-fiction book to go along with; Monkeys! A Kids Book About Monkeys – Facts, Figures and High Quality Pictures of Animals in Nature by, Maya Lee Shye

Sand and Water

            Fill the table with water today and encourage the children to wash any hats that you may have in your classroom.  As they wash can they identify the person who might wear the hat or the purpose of wearing the hat.

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of families and communities; develops growing awareness of jobs and what is required to perform them.  Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions; and for further varied purposes.

Dramatic Play

            Make sure to include play money and a cash register in the center today.  As the children play, talk to them about the coins and their values.  Bring in a set of real coins to match the play coins to.  Add any extra hats and caps that you might have. Make paper tags that show the cost of the hat or other items in the center (hat 10 cents, shoes $5). 

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Math and Manipulatives

            Use the caps page to color and cut out primary color caps.  Make a pattern with the caps and then see if the children can follow with more caps or a manipulative in the same colors (Unifix cubes).  Practice making patterns today. 

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize, duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials.

 Outdoor Play

            Play a mimic type game.  You can play similar to Simon Says but instead of Simon telling the children what to do, the Peddler tells them.  “The Peddler says turn around, the Peddler says run to the tree and back”. 

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Transitions

            Make enough copies of the hats for each child.  Color them according to colors that you might be working on with your group of children.  I use between 4-6 colors.  Tape all of these to a flannel board or the wall where everyone can see them.  Say the following poem and either point to a child/monkey or name them.

            Monkey, monkey in the tree.                     Roger monkey, Roger monkey in the tree

            Give  the purple cap down to me.               Give the purple cap to me.

This is fun to do when you are teaching colors like silver, aqua, and violet.

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; shows growth in matching, sorting, putting in series, and regrouping objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape, or size.

Dear Parent-

            Being able to copy and make patterns is an important skill to learn for later math acquisitions.  Find some objects in your house that you have multiples of (silverware, socks, colored paperclips, etc.) and make a pattern for your child to copy.   When they are able to copy your patterns, challenge them to make a pattern for you to copy.

caps pattern

Animal Cafe,by John Stradler

This story is about an all night cafe for the animals of the neighborhood. Children will delight in learning all that goes into what makes this restaurant run.

Materials

  • Ingredients used for a cooking project or to make your favorite play dough.
  • Several restaurant bags or boxes that would be familiar to the children.
  • Magazines
  • Poster Board
  • Cookbooks with illustrations
  • Pictures of foods on index cards
  • Guest Checks
  • Placemats

Vocabulary

  • Magic (it means something happens which you can not explain, a mystery)
  • Spicing (To add flavor to food to make it taste better)
  • Café (a place where food and drinks are sold, like a restaurant)

Before Reading the Story

Bring several food bags (McDonald’s, Chick-Fil-A, Bojangles) and a pizza box. Ask the children if they know where these come from.

Literacy/Print Awareness & Concepts; recognize a word as a unit of print, or awareness that letters are grouped to form words, and that words are separated by spaces.  

Hold up one of the bags and ask the children to clap their hands if they have eaten there. Hold up the next bag and ask them to put their hands on their head.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multi-step directions.

Count with the children each time to see how many children have visited each restraint.

Mathematics/Numbers & Operations; demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quantity.

After a short discussion on where the children have eaten and like to eat, hold up the book cover and tell them that the story today is called Animal Café.

Reading the Story

Ask questions along the way. What do you think the magic is? Why do you think Casey the cat is in the kitchen, slicing, dicing, and spicing? When the guests start arriving say to the children, “Oh, Casey and Sedgewick are opening up a restaurant or café!”

Literacy/Book KNowledge & Appreciation; shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction and non-fiction books and poetry.

After Reading the Story

With the children list all the things that Casey and Sedgewick had to do to prepare the café for the animals (slicing,dicing,and spicing, decorating, setting the tables, writing the menu, greeting, serving, taking the money and cleaning up).

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops growing awareness of jobs and what is required to perform them.

Music and Movement

Turn this into a song by making up verses to the tune of Fere Jaqua. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QI0abuwq31g

At the café, at the café,                               At the café, at the café,
There’s a chef, there’s a chef                   There’s a menu, there’s a menu
He chops and he dices,                             It tells us all the good foods
He cooks and he spices                            We can order
At the café, at the café.                               At the café, at the café.
Waitress takes our order                          The cleaner scrubs the café
Brings the yummy food                            Keeps it safe and clean

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops growing awareness of jobs and what is required to perform them.

Discovery

This would be a great day to do a cooking project with your children in small group. Dice cheese, slice apples, and spice the apples with cinnamon for an easy snack. Or make a batch of play dough with the children and talk about what happens when you mix the ingredients.

Science/Scientific Skills & Methods; begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials, and observe other processes and relationships.  AND Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Art

Give the children magazines to cut out food pictures and glue them to a piece of poster board.  This can later be hung in the dramatic center as a wall menu for restaurant play.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; develops growing strength, dexterity, and control needed to use tools such as scissors, paper punch, stapler, and hammer . 

Sand and Water

Put out dampened sand and several dishes. Let the children pretend to make sand food.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Library and Writing

Add several cookbooks that have illustrations.

Literacy/Print Awareness & Concepts; develops growing understanding of the different functions of forms of print such as signs, letters, newspapers, lists, messages, and menus.

Cut out pictures of food ahead of time and glue them to index cards. Label the foods. Ask the children if they can help put them onto your word wall.

Literacy/Alphabet Knowledge; increases in ability to notice the beginning letters of familiar words. 

Dramatic Play

Turn your dramatic play area into a restaurant for an extended period of time. Have the children help organize the dishes by putting all the like kinds together

Mathematics/Geometry & Spatial Sense; begins to be able to determine if two shapes are the same size and shape.

 Make copies of the placemat and cover them with contact paper. Show the children how to set the table/s by placing the like dishes over the placemat cutouts. As they are setting the table/s talk to them about how the fork goes on the left and the cup goes above the plate.

Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; enhances abilities to recognize , duplicate, and extend simple patterns using a variety of materials.

Add any menus and food containers that you have collected to the center.  Encourage the children to participate in a variety of roles related to the kitchen and as a guest.  Show the children how to use the guest check to pretend to write down their order.  Observe the children as they play, are they able to  switch and share roles?  Are they able to use restaurant related words (menu, waitress, cook, chef, order)?

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games and in using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.

Math and Manipulatives

Put out all your food related puzzles

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor Skills; grows in hand-eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes, stringing beads, and using scissors.

 Outdoor Play

Play a bounce and catch game.  Have several children stand in a circle.  Bounce the ball to a child and name a food.  The child must catch the bounced ball, name a food and bounce the ball to another.  Continue naming foods.  For older children, make food categories.  Bounce and name food s that you keep in the refrigerator, foods that you might eat for breakfast, favorite foods, etc.

Physical Health & Development/Gross Motor Skills; demonstrates increasing abilities to coordinate movements in throwing, catching, kicking, bouncing balls, and using the swing and slide.  AND Mathematics/Patterns & Measurement; begins to make comparisons between several objects based on a single attribute.

 Transitions

Put any play foods that you might have into a pillow case or bag that the children can not see through.  Let them take turns pulling out a food item and then naming it.

Social & Emotional Development/Cooperation; develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games and in using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.

Resources

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Caillou, A Visit to the Doctor, by Jaceline Sanschagrin

            Caillou is sick so his mother takes him to the doctor. This book gently describes a visit to the doctor’s office and helps remove some  of the  fears that children associate with a doctor and his office.

Materials

  • Hand Washing Chart
  •  Doctor equipment for flannel
  •  Small box of Q-tips
  •  Scale and Measuring tape
  •  Tongue depressors-many 

Vocabulary

  • Fever (When your body is feeling really hot and you feel sick)
  • Stethoscope (the tool the doctor uses to listen to your heart)
  •  Tongue depressor (the flat stick the doctor uses to look at the inside of your mouth and down your throat).                

Before Reading the Story

 Cut out each piece of the Doctor equipment pieces to the group.  Tape one piece at a time to a white board or flannel board.  Ask the children if they know the name of the tool and what it is used for?  After you have gone through all the pieces with the children, play What’s Missing?   Cover the board with a sheet and remove one flannel piece.  Ask the children if they can name what tool is missing?  Continue guessing what is missing and naming Doctor tools.  After you have finished playing this game, introduce the book. Show the front cover, what is the thing that  Caillou has in his hand?  Ask if anyone has ever been sick and had to go to the doctor.  Give the children several minutes to talk about their own experiences at the Doctor’s office.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.

Reading the Story

 Point out Caillou’s face as you read the story.  Can the children tell how Caillou is feeling?  Can they make their facial expression match his?           

Social & Emotional Development/Social Relationships; progresses in responding sympathetically to peers who are in need, upset, hurt, or angry; and in expressing empathy or caring for others.

After Reading the Story

Tell the children that people can get sick from germs. Germs are all around and we get them by touching things and then putting our hands near our mouths.  Remind them that handwashing is the best way to be a germ buster.  With the children go through the steps of washing your hands the proper way and have the children act out the actions (turn on the water, wet your hands, apply the soap, scrub and scrub, do your fingers, do tops and bottoms, rinse your hands under the water, get a paper towel and dry your hands, turn off the water with the paper towel, throw the towel in the garbage).

Physical Health & Development/Health Status & Practices; sho0ws growing  independence in hygiene, nutrition, and personal care when eating, dressing, washing hands, brushing teeth, and toileting.

Discovery

 Measure and weigh the children.  Put a growth chart on the wall so they can visually see how tall they are.  To show weight, use 10 frames.  (If Kelly is 42 pounds you would use 4 10 frames and 2 squares cut from another 10 frame.

Mathematics/Number & Operations; begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities, and written numerals in meaningful ways.

Music and Movement

Teach the children the poem, Miss Molly.  Make actions to do along with the words.  

Miss Molly had a dolly who was sick, sick, sick

So she called for the Doctor to come quick, quick, quick

The Doctor came with his bag and his hat

And he knocked on the door with a rat-a-tat-tat

He looked at that dolly and he shook his head,

Miss Molly put that dolly straight to bed.

He wrote on a paper for a pill, pill, pill,

I’ll be back in the morning with my bill, bill, bill.

Creative Arts/ Music; participates with increasing interest and enjoyment in a variety of music activities, including listening, singing, finger plays, games, and performances.

I think this is called the Rhyme Time Band, find a good beat for yourself.

Shake your body part that rhymes with sand,

Rhymes with grand, rhymes with land.

Everybody shake your hand!

Now jiggle a part that rhymes with peg,

Rhymes with egg, and rhymes with beg.

Everybody, jiggle your leg!

Now circle a part that rhymes with smolder,

Rhymes with colder and with boulder.

Everybody circle your shoulder!

Now wink a part that rhymes with buy,

Rhymes with cry and rhymes with tie.

Everybody wink your eye!

Swing a body part that rhymes with farm,

Rhymes with charm, rhymes with harm.

Everybody swing your arm!

Now bend a part that rhymes with tree,

Rhymes with bee, and rhymes with me.

Everybody bend your knee!

Now twiddle a part that rhymes with drum,

Rhymes with crumb, and rhymes with gum.

Everybody twiddle your thumb!

And twist a part that rhymes with lips,

Rhymes with sips and rhymes with zips.

Everybody twist your hips!

Literacy/Phonological Awareness; progresses in recognizing matching sounds and rhymes in familiar words, games, songs, stories, and poems.  AND Language Development/Listening & Understanding; shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Blocks

 Add a bowl of tongue depressors to the center for creative building.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness.

Art

 Use Q-tips to paint with watercolors.

Physical Health & Development/Fine Motor SKills; progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing, and art tools, including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes, and various types of technology. AND Creative Expression/Art; begins to understand and share opinions about artistic products and experiences.

Sand and water

 Put a very small amount of sand into the table today and give the children tongue depressors to use as writing sticks.  Can they write the letters of their name in the sand? Can they make a D for doctor?

Literacy/Early Writing; progresses from using scribbles, shapes, and pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name.

Library and Writing

Put out the pictures of the doctor tools.  Can the children name the different tools?  Do they know what they are used for?  This is an individualized review of what you did at your story time today.

Approaches to Learning/Initiative & Curiosity; grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas, and tasks.  AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; uses an increasing complex and varied spoken vocabulary.

Dramatic Play

 If you have a Doctor play set, put this out today.  Encourage the children to take turns being the Doctor and the Patient.  Can the patient articulate what they are pretending to be ill with?  Does the Doctor seem to have an understanding of what Doctor’s do?  You can also have the children use stuffed animals for their patients.  I like to purchase a box of cheap bandages that the children can apply to each other.   Remind the children not to put the thermometer into their mouth but perhaps under their arm or behind their knee. 

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops growing awareness of jobs and what is required to perform them.  AND Language Development/Speaking & Communicating; develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions,; and for varied other purposes.

Math and manipulatives

Make a tongue depressor domino game.  Draw a colored line to divide the tongue depressor and put dots on each half.  The children can then use these to play dominos.

Mathematics/Number & operations; begins to make use of one-to-one correspondence in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

Outdoor Play

 If you have a wagon on the playground you can teach the children about paramedics.  The wagon can be the ambulance and you can use scarves as bandages for wounds.  

Social & Emotional Development/Knowledge of Families & Communities; develops growing awareness of jobs and what is required to perform them. 

Transitions

As you dismiss the children to the next activity have them take turns telling the steps for handwashing.  The first child tells step 1 and goes off, ask what comes 2nd, that child tells and goes off, etc.  If you finish all the steps, begin again.

Language Development/Listening & Understanding; demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.